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Posts Tagged west coaster

Beer of the Week: ChuckAlek / Council / White Labs Katerina

Mar 24

From the Beer Writer: Collaboration beers provide the greatest opportunity for brewers to get out of their comfort zones and try their hands at more out-there concepts. For some that means incorporating adjuncts, local ingredients or experimental hops. Then there’s truly next-level ventures like the one recently embarked upon by ChuckAlek Independent Brewers, Council Brewing Company and White Labs, where the latter interest revived somehow-still-active yeast from a 25-year-old bottle of Russian imperial stout. With that biological feat accomplished, ChuckAlek and Council’s brewers went to work crafting a traditional high gravity stout recipe and fermenting it with that yeast strain. The result is Katerina, a 10.5% alcohol-by-volume (ABV) offering that was recently bottled and had its official coming out party at ChuckAlek’s Biergarten in North Park. Unlike most modern day imperial stouts, the beer is lower on the chocolate and coffee scale, instead exhibiting big notes of raisin, date and plum with some brown sugar sweetness and a touch of baking spice. Named for the Russian empress whose love of dark beers spurred the eventual popularity of this style, Katerina is a lovely blend of tradition and modern-day ingenuity.

From the Brewer: “Back in 2015, when I was pouring ChuckAlek beer at the pro-brewers night of the National Homebrewers Conference here in San Diego. Jeff Crane from Council and I discussed a tentative collaboration based on the idea of England’s old Brettanomyces-aged stock ales. The next day I ventured down to Baja with friend and beer historian Ron Pattinson to show him around the burgeoning beer and food scene. It didn’t take long before we were chatting about porter and Ron brought up the famed Courage Russian Stout; telling me how he’d bought up a couple of cases before the beer ceased production in the early ’90’s and he was sure the original Brettanomyces yeast strain was alive and well in the bottle, allowing the beer to hold up extremely well over a couple of decades time. Courage Russian Stout was of the lineage of over 200 years in production of the original Russian Stout brand, which famously became high demand from Catherine the Great of Russia and her Imperial Court. At that time, in the late 1700’s, the beer was produced by Barclay Perkins who held the brand through the 1950’s, at which point Courage bought the brand. Most traditional beer styles have changed radically over time due to factors such as war-time taxation and rationing or laws dictating acceptable beer ingredients. Russian Stout, however, remained rather unchanged in spec: about 10% ABV, loads of high-quality UK hops and long maturation in oak vats. With the help of White Labs, we isolated the yeast strain from a bottle of 1992 Courage Russian Stout from Ron’s private cellar. Genetic identification determined it was actually Saccharomyces (ale yeast) that had heartily survived over 25 years. We then worked with Council to conduct a pilot brew and construct a recipe based on Ron’s research on the Barclay Perkins brewing logs. The result is a big and truly stout beer with raisin and date on the nose, fruity yeast and caramelized sugar flavor up front, then lingering bitter chocolate and orange peel in the finish. The body is full, which rounds out the strong hop charge and roast on the finish. This beer will surely do well with some age and we intend to brew it again with Council to set it down in some barrels in the spirit of the historically oak-vatted porter. The ‘Perkins Ale’ yeast is available to commercial breweries via White Labs and we hope to see others experiment with it!”—Grant Fraley, Head Brewer, ChuckAlek Independent Brewers

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Pizza Port Pub Release Series calendar

Mar 23

In celebration of 30 years in business, the Pizza Port chain of Southern California brewpubs will be canning and releasing some of the most popular creations from its quintet of pubs throughout 2017. The first offering from the “Pub Release Series” was the award-winning imperial coffee porter, Bacon and Eggs, which debuted on March 4 at its brewpub of origin in Ocean Beach.

Nine more beers are slated for release as part of this series. The schedule as it stands at present is as follows. Brewpubs or origin for each beer are listed in parentheses.

  • March: Solana IPA (Solana Beach)
  • May: The Jetty IPA (Ocean Beach)
  • June: The Fish IPA (Bressi Ranch)
  • July: Bottle Shop 10th Anniversary IPA (Carlsbad)
  • August: TBD Beer
  • September: Fest Bier Traditional German Lager (Bressi Ranch)
  • October: TBD Carlsbad Village Beer (Carlsbad)
  • November: Dusk Till Dawn Imperial Porter (San Clemente)
  • December: Liquid Mistletoe Style TBD (Bressi Ranch)

Each of the beers listed above will be put up for sale at all of the brewpubs on their corresponding release dates. The next four beers will be released on their respective brewpub’s specific anniversary date, starting with Solana Beach, which will celebrate 30 years in operation with two days of festivities this Saturday and Sunday, March 25 and 26.

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Fourpenny House coming to La Mesa

Mar 21

It wasn’t until 2014 that the City of La Mesa welcomed its first brewery, the second-coming of iconic San Diego trailblazer, Bolt Brewery. Since then, Helix Brewing opened down the street from Bolt and combo brewery, distillery, restaurant, coffee shop and event space, Depot Springs Brewing has been in the works for roughly three years. All three operations are north of Interstate 8, near and beyond Grossmont Center, but later this year, La Mesa’s heavily trafficked downtown village area will get its first fermentation operation in the form of Fourpenny House (8325 La Mesa Boulevard, La Mesa).

In the works for the better part of a year, this brewpub is the vision of La Mesa resident Peter Soutowood. Two years ago, Soutowood took a family vacation to Scotland and became enamored with the community-hub feel of the region’s public houses. Before long he found himself envisioning such an establishment in the heart of his hometown. The “East County resurgence” he and business partner Khalid Kyler have witnessed—an influx of artisanal businesses, including craft-breweries, coffee roasters and next-level restaurants—provided an environment rife for bringing this dream to life.

Construction is currently underway on Fourpenny House, which will be equipped with a two-and-a-half-barrel brewing system and five-tank cellar. Soutowood will serve as brewmaster and Kyler—who has spent the past several months logging brew-days with numerous San Diego County brewing companies—will be the head brewer. Both have been home-brewing for nearly a decade. Their plan is to craft mostly European styles, including a German wheat beer and gose, Belgian tripel and quadrupel, and, as one would expect given the project’s roots, a Scottish ale. San Diego-style India pale ales, a black currant- and sage-infused pale ale and chicory coffee stout are also part of their game-plan.

On the restaurant-side, Fourpenny House will have a wood-fired oven pumping out pizzas and freshly baked breads. In addition to house beers, wines, ciders and kombucha will also be available on-tap. The timeframe for the brewpub’s public debut is up in the air at present, but is expected to occur in the second half of 2017.

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Escondido’s Offbeat Brewing shutting down

Mar 17

Back when I worked Stone Brewing’s Escondido headquarters, many were the nights when me and my marketing colleagues would walk over to the much smaller brewery down the street and knock off with a pint or two. That operation, Offbeat Brewing Company, was the family-run project of an ex-Stone cellar man following his own muse, crafting mostly sessionable beers, many of which had English roots. So it’s sad to hear that today will be Offbeat’s swan song.

Yesterday, owner and brewmaster Tom Garcia announced he has made the difficult decision to close the doors to his brewery, but not before one last St. Patrick’s Day hurrah. So if you’re looking for a farewell-taste of Bear Arms Brown Ale or Girafficopter Pale Ale, this is it. Garcia says with his lease up, it made sense to close the book on Offbeat. That said, the 15-year industry veteran says he’s not against the idea of trying his hand at the brewing business again.

Offbeat opened in 2012 with a bar built from wood from old pallets and discarded furniture, plus a makeshift brewery Garcia described as “the Millennium Falcon of brewhouses.” From the get-go, the space was punched-up from an artistic aspect. The upper portion of the west wall featured a colorful mural with outlandish characters, while the bottom half and many of the other walls regularly featured art from an array of local artists. That art was for sale with 100% of proceeds going to the artist, so that outlet will surely be missed by the creative sect. And painted portraits of outlandish characters like Deer Grandpa and the aforementioned Bear Arms looked good behind the bar.

In the end, what made Offbeat’s location so great for Team Stone, likely hurt the business in the long run. Surviving in an obscure business park on a side-road a half-mile from a major destination like Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens – Escondido must have been challenging. Choosing between the two equates to a no-brainer of sorts for beer-tourists who’ve come any nominal distance to visit Escondido. But plenty of locals enjoyed Offbeat during its time, mostly for its polar-opposite, laidback vibe and beers.

Offbeat joins other San Diego County breweries that have closed their doors since last summer, including On-The-Tracks Brewery, Lightning Brewery, Valley Center Brewery and Pacific Brewing.

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Beer of the Week: Rock Bottom Devil’s Thumb

Mar 17

Rock Bottom La Jolla’s Devil’s Thumb Belgian-style golden strong ale

From the Beer Writer: As I wrote a short while back, many are the brewers who tell me, “I brew beers that I like drinking.” Judging by the quality of her hoppy offerings, particularly her Mosaic-heavy IPA, I’d say Rock Bottom head brewer Carli Smith has an affinity for lupulin-laced ales. I like when brewers do right by their taste-buds, but find it particularly impressive when they defy them, crafting styles they aren’t as fond of so others may enjoy them. Case in point, Rock Bottom Devil’s Thumb. This Belgian-style golden strong ale is utterly traditional in its look, scent, taste and feel. Its bouquet contains notes of lemongrass and gardenias, while the beer itself offers a vast array of flavor components—honey, lemon rind, white peppercorn, bubble gum and thyme. At 8% alcohol-by-volume, one would expect something overly impactful, but this beer is balanced and drinkable; enough that the beer-menu warns about its tendency to sneak up on imbibers. Smooth, sweet-smelling and delicious…what’s not to like? For that, we’ll have to ask Smith, because she harbors staunch distaste for Belgian beer-styles, making the quality of this ale all that more remarkable.

From the Brewer: “Being at a brewpub, I am able to keep my beer-list stocked with lots of stuff that I like to drink. Belgian beers not being one of those things, they rarely make their way onto my board, but I have a few regulars that really enjoy Belgian beers and they have been bugging me to make one. One of the things that I dislike about Belgian beers is the high amount of residual sugars that are usually present in the final product. So for mine, I wanted to make something that had a pretty simple grain-bill, pretty much just Weyermann Pilsner malt. This way the yeast is the star of the show, and if I could get it to totally ferment out, I knew the finish would be clean with just enough Belgian-ester sweetness. I am really happy with how it turned out, which was extremely surprising to me and everyone else. I get lots of weird looks when I say, ‘Here, try my Belgian beer,’ when everyone knows I strongly dislike the style. When I carbonated it and put it on tap I was able to drink almost a whole eight-ounce serving in one sitting, very big for me…ha. I was inspired to enter it into the San Diego International Beer Festival competition, because I felt that it was an almost perfect representation of the Belgian golden strong ale style. I also thought it would be hilarious if the brewer who hates Belgian beers won a medal for one. Oh, the irony! “—Carli Smith, Head Brewer, Rock Bottom La Jolla

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