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Posts Tagged stone brewing

Brewers Association releases annual list of top U.S. breweries

Mar 14

Earlier today, American brewing-industry trade group, the Brewers Association, released its annual lists of top U.S. breweries for 2017. Not to be mistaken with rankings based on quality, this list is based on total production figures for the past calendar year. It is a list several San Diego County breweries have been a part of for the better part of the past decade, and remain a part of for the year gone by.

In order to provide a more informative picture, the Brewers Association produces two lists. One, titled the Craft Brewing List, includes brewing companies that meet the organization’s definition of “craft brewer.” The most important criteria in respect to these lists is that brewers produce six million barrels of beer or less annually, and are outright independent or less than 25% owned or controlled by a beverage alcohol industry member which is not itself a craft brewer. Meanwhile, an Overall List includes large macro-beer companies and conglomerates.

Stone Brewing remains the highest-ranking local brewing interest on the Craft Brewing List, coming in at number eight. Though sales have slowed for the Escondido-based company, the beer brewed at its large Richmond, Virginia, production brewery aided its ascent. The next-highest locals on the list are Karl Strauss Brewing Company at number 41 and Green Flash Brewing Company at number 43. Karl Strauss remains in the same spot it occupied in 2016, while Green Flash has slipped six places. The latter also operates a Virginia brewery in Virginia Beach, and is in the process of taking over a recently-acquired brewpub in Lincoln, Nebraska, but recently contracted its sales territories, has suffered through two significant rounds of layoffs, and is openly seeking capital investment.

Though Ballast Point Brewing remains the largest beer-making operation in San Diego County, it does not show up on either list. Instead, it is lumped into parent company Constellation Brands, which ranks number three on the Overall List. Stone was the only local independent craft brewery to make it onto the Overall List, coming in at number 18. Both lists can be viewed in their entirety here.

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Stone Brewing files lawsuit against MillerCoors over Keystone branding

Feb 12

Last week, Stone Brewing co-founder Greg Koch began posting a series of cryptic Tweets as a lead-up to a “scrap” that would go down at noon today. Having worked for Stone for numerous years and coordinated on various marketing campaigns with Koch, this had all the earmarks of such an initiative. They are interwoven into the DNA of the 22-year-old, Escondido brewing company, which rose to prominence in the late-nineties and early-thousands thanks as much to its extremely hoppy beers (especially for the marketplace at the time) as Koch’s adventurous marketing, most notably the taunting verbiage on the back of bottles of Arrogant Bastard Ale. But a video and press release that went out earlier today attest that this melee—a lawsuit filed against MillerCoors over the branding of its Keystone line of beers—is quite serious.

The suit alleges that multi-national “Big Beer” conglomerate MillerCoors is purposely trying to create confusion in the marketplace with a recent rebranding of the products in Keystone’s portfolio. A prime example are 12-ounce cans, which break the word “Keystone” into two words on separate lines that read “Key” and “Stone” (which appear in all capital letters). When rotated a certain way, all that is visible is the word Stone. Furthermore, on 30-pack cases, the word “Keystone” appears, but it is depicted so that only the word “Stone” is shown on a can (which is rotated in the manner noted above) and the “Key” merely precedes it. From there, other terms like “Light” are tacked on, again, independent of the can.

“Are we doing this for publicity…no. We figured you ought to know the facts,” says Koch in his video message to consumers (which can be viewed in its entirety by clicking here). “The point is, there’s an intentional obfuscation that they are attempting to run, confusing people with our brand.”

“Keystone’s rebranding is no accident,” adds Stone CEO Dominic Engels. “MillerCoors tried to register our name years ago and was rejected.” He also notes that Keystone’s social-media posts have “almost universally dropped the ‘Key.’”

As an observer employed in a marketing capacity within the brewing industry, I will say that the first time I saw Keystone’s rebrand, I wondered how it would be received by my previous employer. It struck me the same way as it did Koch, as an attempt to piggyback off a legitimate craft brand, albeit through one of the most blatant and sophomoric attempts at subterfuge I’ve seen by a multi-billion-dollar corporation.

In the video, Koch switches from fact- and opinion-driven summation of the lawsuit filing to his trademark, dryly-comedic bashing of Big Beer. He insults the “flavorless and watery” nature of Keystone products and performs multiple spit takes with the beer. While a court of public opinion will not provide judgment on this case (in which Stone is being represented by BraunHagey & Borden LLP), in this day and age, there is no way that craft-beer consumers and the population at large won’t make up their own minds about the merits of the suit. It would seem Koch’s delivery leaves the door open for doubters who would say that, while there is substantial cause for taking MillerCoors to court, Stone is attempting to benefit from as much publicity as possible in the process.

Stone has set up a social-media hashtag—#TrueStonevsKeystone—for people to follow along, primarily with Koch. Of course, this case may never make it to court. As Koch says when addressing MillerCoors in his video: “You can end all of this right here and now by one simple move that reinforces your brand that you’ve built. Put the ‘Key’ back in ‘Keystone.’ Stop using Stone as a stand-alone word. It’s ours.”

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Sampler Flight: February San Diego Beer Events

Feb 1

It may be the shortest month of the year, but February is stocked with beer and brewery events. The anniversaries alone could keep an ale enthusiast busier than a one-armed hop-bine tender (trust me on that one). Peruse this short-list of quality events, then go a step further and take in the full list of goings-on at our constantly updating events page.

February 4 | Super Sunday Cellar-bration: It takes a lot for a non-sporting event to compete with the almighty Super Bowl. Realizing this, Stone Brewing is pulling out all the stops—and some of its rarest kegs—putting on a beer festival at its Escondido eatery featuring vintage beers going back as far as 2005, plus plenty of one-offs and a special food menu. Game on! | Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens, 1999 Citracado Parkway, Escondido, 10 a.m.

February 10 | Brewbies: Supporting a worthy charity is both easy and rewarding at this annual fest put on by the Keep A Breast Foundation, where scads of SoCal breweries bring out their best, including one-offs, many of which are pink-hued in honor of the fight against breast cancer. | Bagby Beer Company, 601 South Coast Highway, Oceanside, 1 p.m.

February 10 | Second Saturday: Hamilton’s Tavern’s monthly tap-takeover extravaganza will feature the varied liquid wares of Karl Strauss Brewing, including Onyx Ledbetter, a black IPA brewed collaboratively with South Park Brewing as the first beer of the 2018 Beer to the Rescue fundraising campaign benefiting the Lupus Foundation of Southern California. | Hamilton’s Tavern, 1521 30th Street, South Park, 5 p.m.

February 14 | Truffles, Truffles Everywhere: Few things scream Valentine’s Day like chocolate confections, and some of the best in San Diego are produced by Andrea’s Truffles. So sweet are her sweets that a whopping three beery venues will feature them during the day of amore. Eppig Brewing is doing a beer-and-truffle pairing, while just down 30th Street, Andrea will collaborate with Mastiff Sausage Company at North Park Beer Co. And over in Beeramar, White Labs will temper its beer pairing with a side of education. Ooh la la! | Various Locations, Times Vary

February 24 | Carnival of Caffeination: In 2017, West Coaster readers voted “Modern Times Beer festivals” as the best beer events in San Diego, and the beer-and-coffee biz is teaming with guest roasters and brewers to put on the second edition of its fete celebrating all things caffeinated, including barrel-aged beers and exotic java, plus live music and food trucks. | Broadway Pier, Downtown, 12 p.m.

Anniversaries Galore: There are so many, I felt inclined to list them. Cheers and happy birthday to the whole lot of them!

  • Feb. 3: 5th Anniversary & Sour Saturday; Fathom Bistro, Bait & Tackle; Shelter Island
  • Feb. 3: 3rd Anniversary, Machete Beer House, National City
  • Feb. 24: 5th Anniversary Party, Culture Brewing, Solana Beach
  • Feb. 24: 2nd Anniversary, Resident Brewing (at The Local Eatery & Watering Hole), Downtown
  • Feb. 24 & 25: XI Anniversary Beer Fest & Beer Garden, SD TapRoom, Pacific Beach

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Oceanside Ale Works closing this weekend

Jan 4

Two days ago I recapped last year’s brewery closures, citing eight that had shut their doors, including two that did so the final week of 2017. Just four days into 2018, it’s already time to cover the New Year’s first impending closure. This time it’s Oceanside Ale Works (1800 Ord Way, Oceanside), which announced yesterday via social media that it will be shutting down, but not before a final service on Saturday, January 6. OAW holds the dubious distinction of being the longest tenured local brewery to go out of business in the modern brewery era.

Inquiries to ownership were not immediately answered.

Established in 2006, OAW rose to popularity as an after-hours industrial-suite hangout, gaining enough of a mostly-local following to substantiate a move to a second location roughly a half-decade later. At that point, ownership upped its available square-footage and brewing capacity while adding a barrel-aging program that went on to earn critical acclaim. After the move, OAW’s traditionally low prices remained below the industry average, but heavy patronage made the math work.

When OAW opened, Breakwater Brewing was its only competition in the City of Oceanside. Now, fermentation operations of all sizes dot the landscape from the renowned Bagby Beer Co. to large-scale operations like Belching Beaver Brewery and Mason Ale Works to Camp Pendleton-adjacent Legacy Brewing to more recent additions such as Black Plague BrewingMidnight Jack Brewing and Northern Pine Brewing to rival for municipality-namesake status Oceanside Brewing. And that doesn’t even take into consideration the 20-plus breweries in the neighboring Vista and Carlsbad communities.

On a personal note, OAW was one of the very first breweries I visited when I really began getting into locally-produced craft beer; venturing to production facilities to find out who made my beer and experience the full breadth of their creations versus simply drinking whatever I encountered on tap at retail establishments. From the moment I walked into OAW, owner Mark Purciel and his staff made me feel right at home and excited about beer. Keep in mind that I was not yet a journalist, simply an eager enthusiast, so the treatment I received was the type afforded every customer.

Having shared conversations with many OAW patrons, including professional brewers such as Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens – Liberty Station brewing manager Kris Ketcham, who participated in his first professional brew with Purciel at the company’s original location on Oceanic Drive, Purciel was a positive driving force that reeled them in and kept them coming back. A former school teacher with a fun brand of mentorship at the core of his being, he was the face of the business, and he will surely be missed in the San Diego brewing scene.

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2017 Recap: Beers of the Week

Dec 22

Each week, I feature a locally produced beer that is special from one of numerous standpoints. Sometimes it’s an anniversary beer, other times I go with collaborations. The draw of something unique often piques my interest, then there are times when a beer just tastes outstanding. But the basic plan of action is to highlight quality ales and lagers from around the county without featuring the same brewery twice during a single calendar year. This year, I decided to list all of the weekly standouts and rank them. In order to best do this, I broke them into categories (apples-to-apples versus triple-IPA-to-cream-ale). As one would expect from a beat this drenched in hop oil, IPAs of all ilks were featured most often, but there were plenty of lagers, Belgian-style ales, stouts and other concoctions. All were good, but some were outstanding enough that they should be recognized here.

Alpine HFS India Pale Ale


A collaboratively brewed Nelson Lager from Dos Desperados Brewery and Prodigy Brewing Company


  • Nelson Lager, Dos Desperados Brewery & Prodigy Brewing, San Marcos: This wasn’t just one of the best lagers I had all year, it was one of the best beers overall; crisp, clean and bursting with Nelson Sauvin character.
  • Natural Bridge Festbier, Eppig Brewing, North Park: This is a beer so well-crafted, true-to-style and absolutely perfect for everyday consumption that I find myself thinking about it just about every day.
  • Herd of Turtles Baltic Porter, Bagby Beer Co., Oceanside: With so few Baltic-style porters in the county, they could have passed any dark lager off as one, but of course, this standout operation aced it.
  • Bird Park Bohemian Pilsner, North Park Beer Co., North Park
  • Helles Yeah! Helles, Division 23 Brewing, Miramar
  • Ragnabock Doppelbock, Longship Brewing, Mira Mesa
  • Sea Señor Mexican Lager, SouthNorte Brewing, Coronado

Origin of Shame from The Lost Abbey

Belgian-style Ales

Bear Cookie Chocolate Peanut Butter Stout seved on nitro at Vista’s Bear Roots Brewing


Hop Slap’d #5 American Pale Ale from New English Brewing

Other Styles

* Author’s Note: This year, Nickel Beer Co. had two Beer of the Week features due to the untimely passing of local publican Larry Koger, for whom owner and business partner Tom Nickel brewed a commemorative beer. It was a good reason to break policy.

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