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Posts Tagged Scot Blair

Beer of the Week: South Park Tongues of Angels

Feb 9

Tongues of Angels 100% Simcoe IPA from South Park Brewing Company

From the Beer Writer: Single-hop India pale ales (IPAs) allow brewers to spotlight the flavors and aromas of individual hop varietals, typically against a light-as-possible malt backdrop. Sipping one can be as educational as it is thirst-quenching. Single-hop beers are the best way to get to know your hops, however, many can come up short compared to multi-hop IPAs. It’s like trying to cook while ignoring all but one ingredient in the spice rack. You’re asking a lot of one type of hop. But when the hop has a lot to offer and the beer is engineered just right, single-hop IPAs can be every bit as good as a beer blending numerous shades of earthen green. Such is the case with South Park Tongues of Angels, a single-hop IPA featuring one of the world’s money hops: Simcoe. South Park Brewing extrudes every iota of sensational character from this complex fruit of the bine. Lemon, orange, grapefruit, wheatgrass, pepper and green herbaceous notes come on strong with little more than the lightest whisp of toasty breadiness to get in their way. The beer is a thing of beauty and proof that “simple” is not a synonym for “plain.”

From the Brewery: “Tongues of Angels is a highly-addictive house beer favorite brewed with some Simcoe followed by some Simcoe topped off by some Simcoe and sprinkled with a little more Simcoe for kicks! From first-wort to dry-hop, this IPA is 100% hopped with Simcoe and designed to showcase the beauty and versatility of this special varietal. Light biscuit flavor and aroma set the base and you will notice earthy, catty, citrusy, fruity notes intermingled with varying levels of pine, displaying all that Simcoe hops are and can be. The beer is soft on the mouth and gentle in the finish, which makes it brilliantly suited for the ‘tongues of angels.’ And after a few of these deceptively drinkable IPAs you may actually begin speaking in the tongues of angels. Prost!”—Scot Blair, Owner & Brewmaster, South Park Brewing Company

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Coronado Brewing to purchase Monkey Paw Brewing

Jul 18

The craft-brewing industry is in a state of flux, forcing companies within it to reexamine their business models and, in the case of larger operations, alter them in order to thrive or, in some cases survive. Larger operations such as Stone Brewing, Green Flash Brewing and Karl Strauss Brewing have all had to adjust course as consumer preferences shift to smaller, local, independent breweries, and active consumer demographics begin to skew toward younger factions, many of which have only ever drunk craft beer. It’s to be expected of interests that are among the country’s 50 largest brewing companies. Though it is considerably smaller and, at its heart still a family-run business, Coronado Brewing Company has been quite vigilant over the past several years, keeping an eye on the rapidly changing market and making moves to weather an uncertain storm. The latest of those moves includes today’s announcement that CBC will purchase East Village-based brand Monkey Paw Brewing. Owner Scot Blair‘s other businesses, South Park Brewing and Hamiltons Tavern, are not part of the deal.

Blair has had lofty aspirations for his beer-making business since opening it in 2011, but was not satisfied with progress toward increased production and distribution. He examined a number of options for meeting those goals, including acquisition, but says he wouldn’t have sold to just anybody. A stalwart figure within the craft-beer world for more than a decade, Blair knows the industry and the individuals within it, and says it was his long-standing respect for and friendship with CBC owners Ron and Rick Chapman that distinguished this as the right move for him and his business. Another key factor is control. Blair has a vision for Monkey Paw and its beers, and will remain intimately involved with the brand, focusing solely on beer—conceptualization and growth of the entire portfolio.

This deal is reminiscent of Green Flash’s 2014 acquisition of Alpine Beer Company. That move allowed for increased production of Alpine beers at Green Flash’s much-larger brewing facilities. Likewise, Monkey Paw, which produced less than 700 barrels last year, will now have the majority of its beers produced at CBC’s Bay Park headquarters, while still making beer on the 15-barrel system at its East Village pub. CBC began brewing its beers at that site—affectionately referred to as “Knoxville” for the street it occupies—in 2013, a year after taking over the 14,000-square-foot property. Since then, it has taken over several other buildings bordering the brewery, creating a rather impressive cul-de-sac campus. CBC is also in the process of installing a kitchen at Knoxville to increase the draw of its tasting room. This is particularly important with the impending arrival of a satellite tasting room from Benchmark Brewing Company and a new brewery, Deft Brewing Company, slated for arrival in Bay Park this year.

CBC is also changing up its game in the southerly municipality of Imperial Beach. The company opened a bar and restaurant there in 2014, and recently signed on to construct a 7,500-square-foot brewpub at the upcoming Bikeway Village on Florence Street. This will increase brewing capacity in a more high-profile location not far from CBC’s original brewpub on its namesake island. Meanwhile, CBC has ceased distribution to certain states, strategically tightening things up to better compete in the marketplace and maximize profits and expenditures.

And two months ago, the company announced the Chapmans’ investment in SouthNorte Brewing Company, a new venture headed by CBC head brewer Ryan Brooks. That operation, basically a CBC offshoot or sub-brand, will meld the brewing cultures of Baja California and Southern California, but there’s more to that fermentation fusion than mere ingenuity. An MO like that figures to appeal to demographics CBC does not currently reach in as great a quantity as they would like. Ditto Monkey Paw’s liquid wares, which skew to a younger demographic more interested in locavorianism, that likely wishes to support an edgier brand versus a company that recently celebrated its 21st anniversary. While this acquisition (which is set to be completed by September) may seem odd to those not paying attention, a look at CBC’s recent body of work where business-model adjustment is concerned shows the logic behind it and how it fits into a large and intricate puzzle.

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Beer of the Week: Monkey Paw Ol’ Colo

Apr 7

Ol’ Colo imperial altbier from Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery in downtown’s East Village

From the Beer Writer: While recently visiting the East Village, I had a chance to catch up with an old colleague, Nick Norton. Both of us are former members of Team Stone, but I hadn’t seen him since he’d left his job assisting Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens – Liberty Station’s brewing manager in that brewpub’s production enclave. His reason for leaving was to become head brewer at Monkey Paw Pub and Brewery, a position vacated late last year by popular homebrewer-turned-phenom Cosimo Sorrentino. The latter took the former under his wing, executing an intensive transition that saw the two spend a great deal of time brewing at the downtown pub as well as participating in collaboration beer projects. It would seem Norton has the hang of things at his new digs. When I showed up, 17 house beers were available and all of them were up to snuff, including holdover standouts like Bonobos San Diego Pale Ale. But the gem of the day for me was a beer unlike any I’ve found throughout the county, Monkey Paw Ol’ Colo, an imperial altbier that drinks like a bready, balanced yet satisfying amber ale. It’s a style Norton presented during his job interview; a beer that helped get him his current gig. That pre-employment prospect comes across nicely in 6.3% alcohol-by-volume reality and is a nice early sign of the new guy’s creativity and appreciation of styles more obscure to the San Diego market.

From the Brewer: “Colo the Western Lowland Gorilla was the first known gorilla to be bred in captivity anywhere in the world at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, and also the oldest gorilla to ever live at 61 years old. In honor of her recent passing, we brewed a slightly bigger version of a Düsseldorf altbier, which we affectionately named after her. With all German malts, American Crystal hops and a German ale yeast, the beer presents a bold amber with an off-white head. A huge bread-crust aroma is supported by a moderate floral hop scent and clean, slightly fruity German ale-yeast presence. The aroma carries over to the flavor, with more bread crust, floral hops and light fruit esters. Medium-bodied, with a crisp carbonation and hardly noticeable alcohol presence, it may be the least ‘cool’ beer to come out in a while, but what it lacks in fashion sense it makes up for in flavor. This is a beer I have wanted to brew since falling in love with the base-style in the form of Space Bar Friends, Stone Liberty Station’s awesome alt. I was really excited when I pitched the idea of an un-hazy, un-juicy malt-bomb of a beer to (Monkey Paw owner) Scot Blair, he was totally on board. Come grab a pint!”—Nick Norton, Head Brewer, Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery

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Monkey Paw brings on new head brewer

Nov 22

logo_mpspbcYesterday, the owner of Monkey Paw Pub & BreweryScot Blair, announced that he has selected the replacement for head brewer Cosimo Sorrentino, who will be leaving his post come the end of the year. That individual is Nick Norton, who has spent the past two years working in the brewhouse at Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens – Liberty Station.

Norton worked on the restaurant-side at Stone Brewing‘s Point Loma brewpub before being brought into the brewery by Liberty Station brewing manager Kris Ketcham. While there, he aided in the production of a wide-ranging and often adventurous portfolio of beers, one of which, Witty Moron, medaled at the Great American Beer Festival, not once, but twice.

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New Monkey Paw brewer, Nick Norton (photo courtesy Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens – Liberty Station)

This hire marks a departure from form for Blair, who has had two brewers at his East Village brewpub over the past five years, both of which were plucked from San Diego’s home-brewing ranks. Though young, Norton has more professional experience coming into this position than Sorrentino or his predecessor, Derek Freese (who currently brews at Modern Times Beer Company).

But heading brewing operations at Monkey Paw was only half of Sorrentino’s job. He was also in charge of beer-making at sister-business South Park Brewing Company. Blair constructed that brewpub next-door to his flagship operation, Hamilton’s Tavern, in 2015, and Sorrentino evolved the brewing program to the point where every beer on-tap was produced in-house.

Blair has decided to take control of the brewery-side of South Park Brewing. But he won’t be alone. In taking the reins, he is promoting cellarman Ryan Traylor to the position of assistant brewer. When asked about the beers that will be produced under this new order, Blair says he’s committed to moving things forward while honoring the past.

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Parting Words: Cosimo Sorrentino

Nov 3

Earlier this week, news broke about popular local brewer Cosimo Sorrentino resigning from his dual-head brewer post at Monkey Paw Pub and Brewery and South Park Brewing Co. A fixture in the community who made a point to communicate and collaborate with nearly every brewery within the county, it was surprising to here he was stepping down, but even more confounding to discover he would absolutely be leaving San Diego come the New Year. More information was in order, so we went to the source to appease readers’ logical queries and concern.

Monkey Paw’s Cosimo Sorrentino checking out the hops yesterday with Nopalito Farm’s Jordan Brownwood; via Facebook

Monkey Paw’s Cosimo Sorrentino (left) checking out hops with Nopalito Farm’s Jordan Brownwood in July; via Nopalito Farms Facebook

West Coaster: What led you to depart your position heading Monkey Paw and South Park Brewing?
Cosimo Sorrentino: A combination of factors, the biggest of which is a necessity for personal growth. I was lucky to learn my craft in the community I grew up in and under an owner that has so much passion, but I feel that I have reached a point where to progress I need a little less comfort and a new environment.

WC: Though your next step has yet to be determined, you are certain you will leave San Diego. Why is that?
CS: I feel San Diego has crossed over to a new era in brewing. The community spirit is being fractured; too many breweries fighting over the same styles, following trends for profit, not enough quality staff to provide front-of-house service…and let’s not get into the distributor issues. This was inevitable and will not necessarily be a bad thing for those making or drinking beer. San Diego beer will get better and those that succeed will benefit from the competition! For myself, I hope that finding a location where the scene is a bit younger will allow me to help foster the same type of conscious collaborative growth that has led to San Diego’s emergence as the beer capitol of the world. It might be selfish, but I have really enjoyed the journey so far and want to keep making new beers with and for new people.

WC: After being such a peacemaker and heavy collaborator within the San Diego industry, is it difficult for you to move on?
CS: Not to be cliché, but this is truly the hardest decision I’ve ever had to make. It means stepping away from, not only the coolest brewing job I’ve seen, but leaving family, friends and, potentially even my dog. I am bummed that I will not have the chance to collaborate with some guys and gals in town—especially some of the new breweries—and that I will not be part of Monkey Paw’s next step as a business, whatever that may be.

WC: What will you miss the most about the San Diego brewing and beer scenes?
CS: One word: HOPS! No, but seriously, I will miss the universal nature of the love for beer and brewers in this city. It will be weird to walk into three-or-four bars in an evening and not run into a fellow brewer or maybe even an educated beer-drinker. I’ve never felt the camaraderie and respect that I have experienced in San Diego with brewers and consumers alike.

WC: What are some of your finest memories of your time brewing professionally in San Diego?
CS: Wow. Hardest question…I’ll never forget the first week I got the job at Paw. I had every brewer that I had looked up to either drop in or hit me up on the phone to help me get dialed in. It was a whirlwind, and I did not fully appreciate it at the time, but this foundation paid off and I will be forever grateful. Those memories were revisited last year when I got to sit in on a collab at Karl Strauss on Columbia Street. Not only did we have (KS brewmaster) Paul Segura, (Gordon Biersch head brewer) Doug Hasker and (Monkey Paw/South Park Brewing owner) Scot Blair brewing that day, (Ballast Point Brewing VP) Colby Chandler dropped in to open some bottles as a farewell to (former Green Flash Brewing Co. brewmaster and current Silva Brewing owner/brewmaster) Chuck Silva on his last day in San Diego. This was only made better by the fact that I had invited (North Park Beer Co. assistant brewer) Joaquin Basauri to drop in. This was early on in Joaquin and I’s friendship and the look on his face as we drank barleywine and talked shop with these godfathers brought me back to that feeling of awe.

WC: What were your goals for the semi-controversial public-forum you held to discuss the changing landscape of San Diego beer?
CS: While the forum never became a series, I hope that the discussion was opened and people are more likely to speak honestly and in an informed manner about the evolution of our city and the industry. I am glad there is a reduced amount of animosity because that energy can be redirected towards progression instead of hate and fear.

WC: Any parting words for our readers?
CS: Thank you for absolutely everything. I hope I’ve returned 10% of the happiness and joy you have given me.

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