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Posts Tagged Pink Boots Society

Craft Q&A: Carli Smith

Nov 14

Head Brewer, Bold Missy Brewery

I first met Carli Smith after being introduced by her mentor, Marty Mendiola. The former had recently resigned from his long-time post at Rock Bottom’s La Jolla brewpub to start his own business, Second Chance Beer Company, and wanted me to meet the protégé who would be taking over his role. (Author’s Note: Smith also apprenticed under Doug Hasker at Gordon Biersch‘s Mission Valley brewpub). About five minutes in, I was confident Mendiola’s brewhouse was in good hands. Smith is a brewer’s brewer with a passion for the history and art of beer-making that has nothing to do with the pursuit of money or stature. She just loves beer and the camaraderie of her chosen industry. During her time at Rock Bottom, she’s consulted and collaborated with many local brewers while also playing a vital role in the San Diego chapter of the industry’s women’s-advocacy group, Pink Boots Society. This has led to her becoming a popular and respected figure in the local beer scene, which makes the news that she’s moving cross-country to take a new position as head brewer at Charlotte, North Carolina’s Bold Missy Brewery even harder for many to accept. But before she moves onward and eastward, we took a moment to get some details.

What inspired you to move from your lifelong hometown?
I’m ready to try something new. About a year ago, I decided it’s time to make a move. I’d made some personal life changes and it got me to the point where I can be more flexible with my living arrangements. Since Rock Bottom has locations everywhere and I really enjoyed working for them, I started looking to see if there were openings at places I could transfer to. Some opportunities came about but nothing came to fruition, so I started looking outside the company. My only parameters were to go somewhere besides California, Texas or Florida—I was open to pretty much anything else. I loved the Pacific Northwest and Colorado—I have some family there—but I only did a little research into the East Coast. But a friend of mine I grew up with in Poway moved to Charlotte four years ago and has been trying to get me to move there ever since. That’s where it all started.

How did you learn of the opening at Bold Missy Brewery?
They actually found me and offered me this job a year ago. They learned of me through the membership directory on the Pink Boots Society website. They sent me an email that got caught up in my spam folder, so I didn’t see it until four months later. I wasn’t actively searching outside Rock Bottom at the time and I felt rude responding after so much time. But when I went to Charlotte to visit my friend recently, I decided to visit and see what I missed out on at an event they were holding. Bold Missy had opened a couple weeks before and it was a beautiful place. I figured they’re open and they have a brewer so they must be happy, but then the owner got up to speak and mentioned they were still looking for a brewer and having a hard time finding someone who would relocate. She also mentioned they specifically wanted a female brewer. My friend gave them my info and they reached out again. This time I got it, spoke with the owner, did a technical brewer’s interview, went out for another visit and then accepted their offer.

Tell us a little about Bold Missy.
I’ll be working on a 15-barrel, American-made system. They have four 15-barrel fermenters and four 15-barrel jacketed bright tanks. They’re only using about 30% of their space at present so there’s lots of room for expansion. The ceiling is high enough that I can put 60-barrel fermenters in there, and they have a really big tasting room with a large patio out front plus a small kitchen doing specialty hot-dogs, flatbreads, pretzels and items like that. In North Carolina, a brewery has to have at least two food items to sell beer—much different from here.

What are Bold Missy’s current beer offerings and do you plan to change anything up?
Their core beers are an IPA, brown ale, blonde ale and a tangerine Belgian witbier, and their names are inspired by women throughout history. The IPA is called Rocket Ride for Sally Ride, Solo Flight Brown is named for Amelia Earhart and the blonde is called Git Your Gun for Annie Oakley. I want to pull back on the extract in the wit and use tangerine peel, juice or pulp to make it all-natural. I’m excited a brown is a core beer because that’s my favorite style to drink and brew. Right now, it’s American-style, but I’ve talked to them about doing an English-style brown ale instead. Barbecue is huge in Charlotte, so I want to brew my smoked porter out there. I also want to try to bring some West Coast flair and West Coast-style IPAs. There are lots of hazy IPAs in the market out there, so I want to introduce clean, clarified beer and show them that can be hoppy and “juicy,” too.

Do you plan to remain involved with Pink Boots Society?
Pink Boots has a state chapter in North Carolina but there aren’t lots of city chapters yet. I think after I get settled I may look into trying to put together a city chapter. I really enjoyed helping to make San Diego’s chapter very educational and empowering with monthly get-togethers where you’re learning something new, advancing knowledge or sharing something with other members.

Do you have any parting words for your many friends in San Diego?
I’m so excited but I’m going to miss everybody terribly. What’s great is that twice-a-year we have big national get-togethers—the Craft Brewers Conference and Great American Beer Festival—so I’ll see everyone there. And I’m really excited that Dan Anderson is taking over for me at Rock Bottom La Jolla. I know he’s going to do an amazing job and put out some really great beers. A big plus for our regulars who enjoy Belgian-style beers is that there’ll be more of them now than when I worked there because he actually likes them.

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Opinion: San Diego beer is better than ever

Aug 23

I’ve religiously covered the San Diego brewing industry for a decade. A big part of that has included checking out new breweries. Interviewing so many brewery owners prior to their debut, it’s always interesting to see their visions brought to life. Unfortunately, the brick-and-mortar realization of these entrepreneurs sometimes pale in comparison to their lofty aspirations. Bad beer—it happens. Drinkers go into new breweries realizing it, but it doesn’t remove the sting of encountering subpar ales and lagers, especially when your purpose for visiting is to honestly assess the quality of an establishment’s wares in print.

There was a three-year period from 2012 to 2015 when I was overwhelmed with the number of new San Diego County breweries opening with beer that tasted like bad homebrew or, worse yet, exhibited significant defects (diacetyl, dimethyl sulfide, acetaldehyde, isovaleric acid, oxidation, low attenuation, etc.). There were some years, as many as half (if not more) of the new operations I would visit would come in low on the quality scale, with some being downright unacceptable. It was a major problem, more for others than myself. I only write about beer, but those who make it—veterans of the local industry brewing good beer—grew increasingly and vocally concerned about the impact the rapidly increasing amount of substandard product would have on our region’s reputation.

Fortunately, San Diego’s status as one of the finest brewing regions in the world has remained intact. So why bring up this dark chapter in an otherwise bright saga? Because over the last two years, visiting new breweries has gone from the iffy chore it had become to the inspiring pleasure that it should be in a premier county for craft beer. So often I’ve left a first session at a rookie brewery feeling pleasantly surprised and incredibly pleased; that lovely feeling that inspires you to want to come back and support the people behind these fledgling businesses. This heart-warming phenomenon has occurred with such regularity that I’d go so far as to venture that the beer in San Diego County, as a whole, is better than it has been at any point in this storied area’s nearly 30 years of beer production.

Each year, I examine the new breweries that are performing best among their recently debuted peers. In the aforementioned era, it was rather easy to separate the cream from rest of the crop. If anything, some so-so interests squeezed in, but the past two years have been different. I have had to increase the number of new breweries to praise to a half-dozen, and even that forced me to leave out some start-ups worthy of recognition last year. Burning Beard Brewing, North Park Beer Co., Resident Brewing, Pure Project Brewing, Bear Roots Brewing and Bitter Brothers Brewing comprised my best-of rookie class for 2016, but I will be the first to say that popular operations Mason Ale Works and Mikkeller Brewing San Diego had as much right for inclusion as the others. In the end I had to split hairs, awarding points for operations that had great beer out of the gate versus those that seemed to find their way several months in. It’s a good time for brewers and drinkers alike when an octet of breweries of this quality open in a single year and I’m forced to scrutinize to this degree.

So what happened to turn things around? Some would say that the current, crowded, ultra-competitive business climate demands it. There are more than 150 brewhouses churning out beer in San Diego County, and plenty more competition from outside interests as well as the ever-present multi-national conglomerates and their acquired and crafty brands. Certainly the need to compete is a driver, but I believe there’s more to it than just that. After all, many say that if you don’t make good beer you’ll be weeded out and left behind, but we have decades of empirical evidence that proves otherwise. So there has to be something else, something more. I think in many cases, it comes down to pride, which is not a deadly sin when it motivates people to be and do their best.

From interviewing many new brewery owners, it seems more and more of them are asking questions of local brewing professionals during and beyond the start-up process. Local brewery owners’ and brewers’ openness to newcomers and would-be competitors has been a hallmark of the San Diego suds scene and cited innumerable times as a key reason the region has risen to prominence. More importantly than having conversations and posing questions, it would seem these entrepreneurs are listening, even when the answers and feedback they receive aren’t what they want to hear, and adjusting their courses accordingly or striving harder to produce quality beer. Many are the homebrewers in the past who were so enamored with their recipes and the 100%-positive feedback of their friends and family that they felt no need to ask for help or lean on the immense experience located almost inconceivably right at their fingertips.

And speaking of homebrewers, while there’s still a large number of them getting into the professional brewing ranks without ever having worked a day in a commercial brewery, more brewery owners are either employing or consulting with fermentation specialists who have built résumés sporting stints well beyond their garages. And it’s making a big difference in the quality of product. Since Bill Batten, the former head brewer for Mikkeller San Diego and senior brewer for AleSmith Brewing, resigned in March, he has consulted on a handful of projects, offering invaluable advice, while he waits to take the reins at his future home, TapRoom Beer Company, a brewpub being built in North Park by the owners of Pacific Beach bar and eatery SD TapRoom. Other brewing-industry veterans have been brought in to ensure smoother sailing, both at work-in-progress interests and already operational facilities, and it has paid off in each case.

Then there are the large breweries incapable of providing enough advancement opportunities to maintain staff because there are only so many master, head, senior and lead positions to go around. This requires brewers further down on the org chart to climb the ladder by switching employers. Of course, some of them were only there to get their boots wet in the first place, learning the ropes in order to apply lessons and experience to their own breweries at some point. To see this in action, one need look no further than the Brewery Igniter complex in North Park, where Ballast Point Brewing alums Clayton LeBlanc and Nathan Stephens are gaining a fast name for their new employers at Eppig Brewing behind top-notch beers, and former Stone Brewing small-batch brewer Brian Mitchell is crafting quality out-there beers at his passion project, Pariah Brewing. And up in Vista, another pair of Ballast Pointers, Ryan Sather and Chris Barry, have won over North County imbibers at their fantasy-themed Battlemage Brewing.

Frankly, experienced talent like this wasn’t available in such quantity in the darker days. There are more skilled employees for brewery owners to secure and utilize to their fullest, and they are, even with an unprecedented level of attrition. In recent years, San Diego has lost a certain percentage of top-name talent to other regions. Key departures include former Green Flash Brewing brewmaster Chuck Silva who returned to his Central Coast roots to open Silva Brewing, Pizza Port Solana Beach head brewer Devon Randall moving to Los Angeles to helm Arts District Brewing Company, as well as Cosimo Sorrentino and Ehren Schmidt of Monkey Paw Brewing and Toolbox Brewing, respectively, both of whom moved to Denmark to accept high-profile positions.

Further aiding the cause are the camaraderie and support of San Diego industry organizations such as the San Diego Brewers Guild and the local chapter of the women’s advocacy-focused Pink Boots Society. These have always been factions built to support the rising tide and individual riders of that wave. They are safe havens of sorts for those who choose to pull into port. There are still those who eschew the Guild or feel that mostly-volunteer organization should come to them and win them over before they join (incorrect), but largely, those who want to be a part of the local industry realize the strength and resources that come with the numbers and relationships to be formed in such groups, and register their businesses as soon as they are able. Not coincidentally, member breweries tend to do much better than those who elect to be outsiders.

In addition to the openness and espirit de corps of the Guild and PBS, there is an undercurrent of don’t screw this up for the rest of us that inspires if not forces members to do their darnedest not to fall out of favor with membership by hurting the region’s overall reputation care of bad beer or ill-advised business practices. It’s hard to show your face among your contemporaries when your business or its products are known for having a counterproductive effect that potentially effects them (unless you are completely oblivious and lack self-awareness, and there certainly are plenty of those individuals in the mix). To a degree it comes down to the power of peer pressure, which like pride, it is not necessarily a bad thing when it motivates people to be and do their best.

The past two years have also seen more brewery closings than any 24-month stretch in the history of the local brewing scene. A number of these operations made poor beer, and their removal from the pool raised the level of the liquid within it. And a significant number of the breweries that previously made low-quality beer have upped their game over the years. To some extent, that has to do with the natural evolution of brewing. More people are doing it, thus information regarding techniques yielding optimal results is more readily available than ever before, as is top-notch and ever-advancing technology, but in most cases, it simply comes down to those operations gaining much-needed experience and driving themselves to be better, which is to be recognized and praised.

Four years ago, I ventured the opinion that there had never been more bad beer being brewed in San Diego than ever before, but things have changed for the better. Exploring new breweries—and breweries in general—is fun again, and more likely to involve defect-free and, often, exceptional ales and lagers. For the reasons above (and many more), the quality of San Diego beer as a whole is better, in my opinion, than at any time since I’ve been covering this beat. Kudos to the many in the industry working collectively and individually to maintain our region’s integrity and reputation.

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Q&A: Grant Fraley

Jul 17

Grant Fraley (far right) poses with The Boston Beer Company’s Jim Koch (third from left) and other mentorees from the Brewing the American Dream experienceship

Co-owner & Head Brewer, ChuckAlek Independent Brewers

In 2015, ChuckAlek Independent Brewers entered into an “experienceship” with The Boston Beer Company—the producers of Samuel Adams beers—via the Brewing the American Dream program. This business mentorship opportunity included an influential meeting with Boston Beer founder Jim Koch that helped ChuckAlek’s owners, Grant Fraley and Marta Jankowska, refine their business strategy and led to their decision to open a second location in North Park. The experience also birthed Time Hop Porter, a beer brewed in collaboration with Samuel Adams. It was released during several events in the San Diego area in 2015, providing valuable exposure for ChuckAlek. That business stands to get a great deal exposure starting today, when that beer is re-released in limited-edition Brewing the American Dream Collaboration Packs that will go on-sale nationwide. ChuckAlek’s beer wil share space with brews from fellow experienceship mentoriees Roc Brewing, Bosque Brewing, Woods Beer and Brewery Rickoli. We caught up with Fraley to get some insight on this big development and ask about his experiences with Boston Beer.

How did the concept for Time Hop Porter beer come about?
Porter has always been a passion at ChuckAlek and we’d experimented with a dry-hopped porter, as was traditionally in 19th century England. It turned out Eryn Bottens, who oversaw the impressive research-and-development nano-brewery run alongside the 10-barrel system at Sam Adams’ Boston brewery, also had interest in pushing big citrus notes from American hops on the back of a chocolaty British-style porter.

Have you interacted with other Brewing the American Dream mentorees?
I visited Boston and had the opportunity to meet the other brewers in 2016 as we all prepared to scale up our collaborations for the 12-pack release. It was really inspiring to hear the business journey of each of them and the impact that Brewing the American Dream has had on us all. Jim Koch’s book, Quench Your Own Thirst, was released not long before our visit and we had a great time chatting with him over some of the stories and lessons in the book while sharing beers from each of our respective breweries.

What led you to seek mentorship through Brewing the American Dream and what’s it been like?
Early in our company’s days, we received a small loan to kickstart distribution of our beer beyond our tasting room, which was funded by Brewing the American Dream through The Boston Beer Company’s lending partner Accion. We attended many events such as speed coaching and webinars, and caught wind of the experienceship program that recipients of Brewing the American Dream loans could apply for. Marta and I spend two days in Boston to kick off the experienceship, during which we met with many of the executives and brewers at The Boston Beer Company. We’ve maintained connections with several of them and they’ve continued to mentor us. Marta also had the opportunity to travel to Bavaria with members of the Pink Boots Society via a Brewing the American Dream scholarship, which was great given our big focus on German-style beers.

What do you think of the profits from the Brewing the American Dream 12-packs going to Accion?
Many of the awesome food and beverage businesses in San Diego have received loans from Brewing the American Dream through Accion in their salad days. It’s tough to obtain funding from the big banks when you’re just getting going, especially for a capital-intensive business like brewing. Accion also takes it a step further and engages with business resources to help their clients succeed. It’s great to be a part of giving back to their mission and the Brewing the American Dream program.

Will you have any events around this beer that San Diegans can take part in?
We are having a release event with Sam Adams this Tuesday, July 18 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at ChuckAlek Biergarten (3139 University Avenue, Northh Park). Time Hop Porter will be poured alongside hosted food by Nana’s Heavenly Hot Dogs (another BTAD loan recipient) with live music by Peter Hall. Details can be found online.

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Sampler Flight: June Events

Jun 1

While the rest of the country waits for summer, San Diegans get a leg up on the season thanks to eternal sunshine. Take advantage of this benefit of Southern California residence by getting out ad drinking in local beer at any of the many events taking place in June. Start with the following featured happenings, then check out even more on our events page.

June 1 | Beer to the Rescue Extra Innings: So you missed the 43 May events raising funds for the Lupus Foundation of Southern California via sales of special beers from local breweries? No problem. There’s one more bonus event with charity beers from Bay City Brewing, Mason Ale Works, Nickel Beer and Resident Brewing plus lip-smacking, rib-sticking barbecue fare! | West Coast BBQ & Brew, 6126 Lake Murray Boulevard, La Mesa, 5 p.m.

June 3 | Pink Boots 10th Anniversary Beer Festival: The Pink Boots Society is celebrating a decade of promoting the inclusion and importance of women in the brewing industry with a great big beer festival featuring a bevy of breweries bringing their A-game—including numerous beers brewed by PBS members—in honor of the great work and impact of this fine organization. | Ingram Plaza at Liberty Station, 2751 Dewey Road, Point Loma, 12 p.m.

June 10 | 3rd Anniversary Party: Council Brewing Company is going big with its anniversary festivities, breaking out a beer list 50-plus strong. More than 30 of those brews will be barrel-aged. They’ll also debut an 11.2% ABV biere de miel (a bubbly, honey-infused French-style farmhouse ale) in corked, caged bottles during a celebratory toast taking place at 1:30 p.m. | Council Brewing Company, 7705 Convoy Court, Kearny Mesa; VIP: 11 a.m., General Admission: 12 p.m.

June 16-18 | San Diego International Beer Festival: The San Diego County Fair’s salute to suds is our region’s largest annual beer festival. Start the day with funnel cakes, carnival rides and jacuzzi shopping, then get your fill of unlimited samples of beers from all over the world, many of which took home awards in the competition component of this grand-scale summertime stalwart. | Del Mar Fairgrounds, 2260 Jimmy Durante Boulevard, Del Mar, Times Vary

June 24 | SOCIETE 5: This two-phased beer festival and multi-coursed feast has been sold out for months. So why is it listed here? Because Societe Brewing rarely debuts new draft offerings, but they’ll tap four at this event and all of them will be available to the public the next day. If you’re going, great. If not, no biggie. Those beers will taste just as good on Sunday! | Societe Brewing Company, 8262 Clairemont Mesa Boulevard, Kearny Mesa, 1 p.m.

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November Events Sampler Flight: Best of Beer Week

Nov 1

sdbw_logoIf ever there were a month made for craft-beer revelry, November is it. San Diego Beer Week takes place from November 4-13 and includes literally hundreds of events throughout the county. They range from pint-nights to full-on festivals. It’s a choose-your-own-adventure of sorts, allowing beer-fans to tailor these ten days to their personal tastes. I urge everyone to have it your way, but in an effort to guide those looking for a good time as I see it, I’ve listed my dream Beer Week scenario below. Enjoy the hoppiest time of the year, but don’t forget there are plenty of other awesome events taking place before and after Beer Week. For the most comprehensive list of local events around, consult the constantly updated West Coaster events calendar.

Friday, November 4

  • Rare Beer Breakfast, Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens, Escondido
  • 4-Year Anniversary & Barrel-Aged Bottle Release, Amplified Ale Works, Pacific Beach
  • VIP Brewer’s Takeover, Port Pavilion at Broadway Pier, Downtown

Saturday, November 5

  • Beer for Breakfast with Abnormal Beer Co., Small Bar, University Heights
  • San Diego Brewers Guild Festival, Port Pavilion at Broadway Pier, Downtown
  • Fall Brewing 2nd Anniversary with The Creepy Creeps, Casbah San Diego, Little Italy

Sunday, November 6

  • Modern Times Vegan Brunch, Churchill’s Pub & Grille, San Marcos
  • Barrel-Aged Vanilla Storm Bottle Release, Rip Current Brewing Company, North Park
  • The Bruery Beer Dinner, George’s at the Cove, La Jolla

Monday, November 7

  • Fishing with the Brewers; Fathom Bistro, Bail & Tackle; Shelter Island
  • Pink Boots Society Special Release, Rock Bottom, La Jolla
  • Brew, Views & Chews, Tom Ham’s Lighthouse, Harbor Island

Tuesday, November 8

  • Table Beer Tap Takeover, Benchmark Brewing Company, Grantville
  • Beer to the Rescue Bad Hombre Release, White Labs, Miramar
  • Chicks for Beer with Laura Ulrich, The High Dive, Bay Park

Wednesday, November 9

  • Sour Beer Fest, Intergalactic Brewing Company, Miramar
  • Speedway Grand Prix, AleSmith Brewing Company, Miramar
  • Tyson’s Big Ass Barrel Night, O’Brien’s Pub, Kearny Mesa

Thursday, November 10

  • San Diego County Beer Week Frisbee Golf Tourney, Morley Field & Hamilton’s Tavern, South Park
  • The New Kids Brewing & Distilling Festival, Marina Village, Mission Bay
  • Paradox Beer Dinner, The Bellows, San Marcos

Friday, November 11

  • We Got the Funk, Pizza Port, Ocean Beach
  • Battle of the Guilds, Toronado, North Park
  • Roll Out the Barrels, North Park Beer Co., North Park

Saturday, November 12

  • Stone AHA Rally, Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens, Liberty Station
  • Carnitas’ Snack Shack Beer Brunch Buffet, Thorn St. Brewery, North Park
  • 2nd Anniversary Celebration, O’Sullivan Bros. Brewing Company, Scripps Ranch

Sunday, November 13

  • Danksauce & Dog Show, The Quartyard, East Village
  • Garage Sale with Garage Project, Sessions Public, Ocean Beach
  • Beer Garden, The Lodge at Torrey Pines, La Jolla

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