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Posts Tagged jordan hoffart

Escondido Brewing is San Diego’s smallest brewery

Jul 12

Evan Smith enjoys creating things and pushing the envelope in the process. That’s the approach he took with his family business, Escondido Feed and Pet Supply, which has been in operation for decades but gained a reputation as one of the nation’s best stores of its kind only after Evan took the reins. When looking to take on a new entrepreneurial enterprise, he set his sights on craft brewing. A friend of Jordan Hoffart, he had discussions about investing in the pro-skateboarder’s Black Plague Brewing, which recently opened in Oceanside with a 20-barrel system, and grand-scale sales and distribution ambitions. In the end, the big-time wasn’t for Evan. So he went the exact opposite route, building San Diego County’s smallest fermentation interest, Escondido Brewing Company (649 Rock Springs Road, Escondido), which opened last weekend.

In doing so, Evan enlisted the services of an Escondidian homebrewer with scads of beer-competition wins under his medal-clad belt, Ketchen Smith. Together, they went to work building their brewery “like a tiny home.” With only 300 square feet at their disposal, even the most common construction tasks had to be analyzed and strategically managed. They had to cut a vertical foot off the cold-box and reverse the door. They had to install a sink small enough that it would allow them to open doors to that cold-box and the dishwasher on either side of it. And they had to install a bar-top that can be removed to allow a roll-up garage door to fully close. But they relished these challenges and maximized their space in the process. That removable bar-top can also be shifted to a lower rung to allow for service to patrons in wheelchairs, and visible fermenters stored in a converted liquor-store refrigeration unit are lit in a way they lend ambience to the place.

Escondido Brewing founders Ketchen (left) and Evan Smith

Having seen many a brewery in my day, Escondido Brewing is a testament to thoughtfulness, elbow grease and sheer will to make something happen. The Smiths smithed most of this big little project on their own, and what they didn’t do themselves, they got help from courtesy of friends and relatives. The business is a sterling example of what a hometown brewery should be, right down to founders whose aspirations are entirely confined to the city they love and live in. With shaded bar-seating and a trio of picnic tables making up the entirety of Escondido Brewing’s seating options, the business is a far cry from the sprawling gardens and critically acclaimed two-story restaurant at nearby Stone Brewing, the county’s largest independent craft-beer producer. And that’s the point. It’s a nice departure, especially for locals looking to avoid out-of-town beer geeks and tourists; a polar-opposite option that larger, regional breweries needn’t worry about competing with.

Amore for Escondido is further communicated through the names of the brewery’s beers—Hidden City Pale, Rock Springs Red, Hopcondido IPA—and most are based off homebrew recipes Ketchen has won multiple awards for. The most pertinent of those is the first release in a rotating Hop Animal series of ever-changing India pale ales called Marshall Nose IPA, the recipe for which took second overall at last month’s Homebrew Con, the country’s foremost amateur-brewing competition. Pale gold in color and hopped with massive amounts of Citra and Mosaic, it features big aromas of lemon balm, hay and loam accented by flavors of melon, mango, lemon and orange. Smith says it’s inspired by West Coast breweries that have pushed for so long to develop hop-forward beers devoid of caramel color and heavy malt presence. Smith’s other IPA, Hopcondido, comes across like lemon meringue pie on the nose and fresh-cut grass on the tongue, while his pale (which was previously brewed at Coachella Valley Brewing Company following a win at the Hops and Crops homebrew competition) goes from delicate in the front to assertive, late-90’s bitterness on the back end. A milk stout referencing Escondido’s year of incorporation (1888) is all chocolate and cola, while a whiskey barrel-aged version brings vanilla and caramel into the equation without lending over-the-top booziness. All in all, it’s a fun and enjoyable opening line-up, especially given the intimate environs in which these ales were birthed.

Being so small and brewing beer one-and-a-half barrels at a time makes for the real and constant possibility that the Smiths will run out of beer. To combat that, they have trimmed their hours of operation to Fridays from 4 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 2 to 8 p.m. However, they do plan to play off a description lauded on them by several of their customers deeming them the brewery equivalent of a food-truck, by having spontaneous pop-up openings when beer inventory allows for it. Another fun twist that couldn’t exist at a brewery registering as any more than “tiny”.

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Black Plague taps Bear Roots owner to oversee brewing

Jan 25

Terry Little is in the middle of expanding the nanobrewery he built in the back of his homebrew shop, Bear Roots Brewing (1213 South Santa Fe Avenue, Vista), into a larger operation. That means going from a one-and-a-half-barrel system to a six-barrel brewery and outfitting his cellar with six-barrel fermentation tanks. In addition to this sizable undertaking, he’s recently taken on a new job…as director of brewer operations for another brewery altogether.

That operation is Black Plague Brewing Company (2550 Jason Court, Oceanside) a work-in-progress slated to open later this year in North County. We originally reported on this upcoming business last February, citing Vista as its prospective location and Philip Vieira as the business’ head brewer, but outside obligations have forced Vieira to back out of the brewhouse and Black Plague has since settled in a 12,945-square-foot facility in O-side. The company’s ownership saw securing Little as a way to better ensure brewing goes as well as it can early on.

1347 IPA, a Black Plague prototype beer brewed at Bear Roots Brewing

It started with the Black Plague team (which includes pro skateboarder Jordan Hoffart) simply asking brewing-oriented questions of Little, who, in the spirit of San Diego brewer camaraderie, was happy to share whatever he could. Eventually, they found his assistance so helpful they made him an offer to oversee their brewing program as well as test out their prototype beers on Bear Roots’ system versus Black Plague’s 20-barrel system.

The first of those test-beers, an India pale ale called 1347, was on-tap during last weekend’s first-anniversary festivities. The beer is a cross between a West Coast and East Coast IPA that was hazy and big on fruit character. The palate presented flavors of guava, peach and orange, with the slightest bit of toastiness and a lasting resinous quality in the finish. It was very enjoyable and made this reporter excited for future beers from Black Plague.

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