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Posts Tagged indiebeer

Intergalactic Brewing’s uncertain future

Jun 23

When I first met Alex Van Horne he was looking to install a sci-fi-themed brewery in Poway. The plot reminded me of that of Jim Crute, who installed his science-themed Lightning Brewery in Poway a half-decade or so before. Crute sold his manufacturing assets to Orange County-based Cismontane Brewing Company earlier this month after failing to find a buyer for his struggling operation. Though Van Horne eventually opened his Intergalactic Brewing Company in the Miramar community, his plot-line remains similar to Crute’s. Today, the business-owner and brewmaster announced that he is beginning the process of “exploring all options” for the future of his brewery, “including, but not limited to, putting the business assets up for sale.”

Van Horne says he opened his business with insufficient capital; a mere $25,000. In spite of this, Intergalactic earned a strong cult following, enough that the award-winning brewery was able to take over a larger suite in Intergalactic’s business-park home and convert it to a tasting room, in turn expanding brewing operations at the original location. Still, Van Horne says that over the past year “it has become increasingly obvious that the brewery in its current formulation is not able to provide a stable economic foundation [for him and his wife] to begin the next chapters of [their] lives.”

Van Horne has sought out investors, but did not secure enough money to sufficiently modernize his brewery. So the boot-strapping continued, and it went rather well, but this may be the end for Intergalactic in its current form. He will be fielding inquiries from interested parties and, with any luck, the brand will survive, but Intergalactic may go the way of Lightning, and Van Horne may bow out of the brewing industry altogether. But for now, the business remains open. Van Horne hopes to see long-time fans in the coming months, so they—and he—can enjoy the brewery in its current form. Van Horne says he is “infinitely grateful” for the help and support he has received from his contemporaries in the craft-beer industry. He is keen to stay aboard for his brewery’s next chapter, but will be alright even if that’s not in the cards. “At the end of the day, it’s a business,” he says. “I’ll still have my friends, colleagues and many customers supporting me wherever I go or whatever I do. That’s the most rewarding part.”

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Beer of the Week: Duck Foot KASHI-entious IPA

Jun 23

KASHI-entious IPA from Duck Foot Brewing Company

From the Beer Writer: Large doses of CTZ, Cascade and Chinook hops went into this week’s featured beer, Duck Foot KASHI-entious IPA, but the ingredients that make it particularly special are those that make up the malt bill: oats and wheat. Pretty sexy, eh? Under normal circumstances, this is hardly noteworthy, but the components in question are “transitional”. Few know what this means, but that’s why this India pale ale was brewed, to help educate the public on ingredients produced by American farmers during the lengthy period required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to gain Organic certification. The idea for this came from Solana Beach-based Kashi, who helped Duck Foot Brewing Company procure the transitional oats and wheat for this beer, which comes in at 7.4% alcohol-by-volume and comes across as a bit of a throwback to the days when IPAs had long-lasting, assertive bitterness. A lemon bouquet gives way to grapefruit and toasted biscuit notes on the palate, leaving a tacky pithiness in the back of one’s throat. Much like newfound info about Organic certification, it’s a lot for the mind and taste buds to contemplate. The beer debuts today and will also be on tap at Duck Foot’s second anniversary party, which will take place on Saturday, July 8.

From the Brewer: We’ve collaborated with San Diego’s own Kashi on this IPA brewed with transitional ingredients in order to help American farmers in the process of increasing organic farmland. It takes three years for farmers to convert their fields to be eligible for USDA Organic certification. During this time, they cannot use pesticides, but they also cannot yet call their crops Organic. Kashi…and now Duck Foot…is trying to raise awareness of the hardship that these farmers endure during this ‘transitional’ period. By featuring transitional ingredients in this beer—in this case, rolled oats and hard red winter wheat—we hope to help promote their cause. As Kashi would say: ‘Don’t just brew something awesome, do something awesome!’”—Brett Goldstock, Chief Fermentation Officer, Duck Foot Brewing Company

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Coronado Brewing building kitchen in Bay Park

Jun 20

Drink beer and eat food…a perfect pairing. Such is the equation for ideal connoisseurship outlined by Coronado Brewing Company COO Kasey Chapman. It’s proven successful at the company’s original island brewpub and Imperial Beach satellite bar-and-restaurant, and soon will be called into service at its headquarters on Knoxville Street in Bay Park. CBC is in the process of installing a kitchen to service the tasting room at that production facility, the largest of its properties.

While mobile food vendors have done a good job for CBC, they are looking forward to providing a consistent food option for tasting room patrons. They believe being able to rely on that constant amenity will encourage customers to stick around longer rather than leave in search of edible sustenance.

The kitchen will be 1,000 square feet and outfitted with countertop cooking equipment as well as a double-decker pizza oven. Those mechanisms will be used to produce casual fare that will include, pizzas, calzones, panini sandwiches, wraps, salads and an assortment of appetizers. Beer will be incorporated into select dishes, but that will not be a focus of the menu.

A panoramic shot of Coronado Brewing Company’s Bay Park tasting room and brewery

The project has taken longer than expected, but is expected to be completed by August. Next up for the Bay Park tasting room will be installing additional seating. Even after that, it will retain its identity as a sampling space rather than take on a restaurant feel. Counter service and delivery care of food runners will make up day-to-day operations, and CBC is looking forward to holding special events such as beer brunches and barbecues.

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Beer of the Week: Alpine HFS

Jun 16

Alpine HFS India Pale Ale

From the Beer Writer: Acronyms are used across the alcoholic-beverage industry, typically to describe particularly fine product. Cognac uses VSOP (very special/superior old pale) and XO (extra old), and I’ve always been a fan of Napa-based Chateau Potelle’s using VGS (very good shit) to describe its finest vintages. Alpine Beer Company issued an acronymous handle to its Mosaic-, Simcoe- and Citra-infused India pale ale…Alpine HFS. It’s not so much a descriptor as a reactionary phrase broken down into a publicly suitable format; the sort of happily expletive-laced comment one’s liable to make after tasting this rich, bold IPA. It debuted to great fanfare last year as a draft-only offering before taking a bronze medal in the American-style Strong Pale Ale category at the Great American Beer Festival. The next chapter in this brew’s short but illustrious lifespan is its first release in bottles. That will take place starting at noon, today at Alpine’s tasting room in its namesake East County town. They don’t figure to stay in stock for long. Show up tomorrow to pick some up and you may find yourself shouting Holy F***ing S*** for all the wrong reasons.

From the Brewer: “The beer that named itself. We always strive to offer the best beer we can possibly make, and with this beer we felt it was perfect right out of the gate. No adjustments were necessary. We got exactly what we wanted out of the beer: huge hop aroma, light body and immense drinkability. We hope this beer stays in heavy rotation.”—Shawn McIlhenney, Head Brewer, Alpine Beer Company

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Q&A: Jeff Josenhans

Jun 15

Lead Mixologist & Certified Cicerone, Level II, U.S. Grant Hotel & Grant Grill

Picture it: You sit down at a bar, enjoy two or three IPAs rich with the fruity, piney aromas and flavors of hops, then get right up and immediately drive home. This is ill-advised, irresponsible and downright illegal behavior. But the information I didn’t supply you with before introducing this scenario is that those hypothetical beers are non-alcoholic. And though it sounds like a riddle based on fiction—c’mon, there’s no such thing as a vibrantly hoppy non-alcoholic IPA—this is a real-world situation that can be played out at the U.S. Grant Hotel’s bar, lounge and restaurant, Grant Grill, where level two Cicerone Jeff Josenhans has taken to removing alcohol from cask ales, before recarbonating, bottling and adding them to the menu. It’s the latest step in the venue’s non-alcoholic craft beverage program, which also includes spirits and cocktails. We sat down with Josenhans to find out more about his methods and what could be perceived by some purists as madness.

West Coaster: What inspired you to explore non-alcoholic beers in this manner?
Jeff Josenhans: It literally just dawned on me how there are no craft non-alcoholic beers on the market, and I thought to myself “how can this be possible?” The non-alcoholic quality beverage segment as a whole—wine, cocktails, etc.—is growing as well, so I just put two and two together. There’s really no reason you can’t drink craft beer at work in a non-alcoholic form.

WC: Walk us through the process of removing alcohol from traditional beers.
JJ: Basically, we maintain the temperature of the beer at 180 degrees Fahrenheit using an immersion circulator, which also keeps the beer in motion. We keep that process going for about 30 minutes or until we can’t detect any alcohol fumes for at least five minutes. Like other commercial non-alcoholic beers or kombucha, there is still a minute amount of alcohol expected to remain in the beer, albeit less than one percent. There really is no such thing as 100% guaranteed no-alcohol beer. O’Doul’s states 0.5% alcohol-by-volume (ABV), Becks Non-Alcoholic states 0.3% ABV and, similarly, when reducing wine into a sauce, you cannot completely guarantee there is no alcohol and that it is at a level which is considered safe to consume and drive, for example. What we do is measure the volume of the liquid and equate it with the loss in volume per the original ABV. For example, if we have 10 liters of 6% ABV pale ale, after the 30-minute process we should have 9.4 liters left.

WC: What styles do you offer and what led you to select them?
JJ: Our current bottled beers are Office IPA, Strawberry Blonde, PC Pilsner, Safe and Sour, and Button-Down Beer. The selection process is directly correlated to the casks we run at Grant Grill. If we don’t have enough left over from a cask at the end of a night, we do not produce any non-alcoholic beer. If there is at least one-third of the cask left, we make a decision to bottle and start the process. We are creating craft-beverage offerings and avoiding waste at the same time.

WC: You’re using local cask ales. Where are you procuring them?
JJ: We always have cask ale on Fridays and Saturdays, and currently partner with New English Brewing, 32 North Brewing, Mike Hess Brewing, Acoustic Ales Brewing Experiment, Fall Brewing and Modern Times Beer.

WC: What would you say to those who don’t see a need for non-alcoholic craft beer?
JJ: There’s no shame in offering people who can’t drink for whatever reason—designated driver, pregnant, religion, whatever—a craft-beer alternative. To be honest, I really don’t understand how the craft market hasn’t got to this yet. It think it’s about time!

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