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Posts Tagged india pale ale

Beer of the Week: Resident Saison Prestige

Jan 12

Saison Prestige from downtown’s Resident Brewing Company

From the Beer Writer: Whereas most craft fans’ favorite beer style is IPA (not that there’s anything wrong with that…they’re incredible), my favorite beers are Belgian-style farmhouse ales. But wait, like the IPA fan who can tell you they specifically like unfiltered, 7% alcohol-by-volume, tropical-flavored India pale ales dry-hopped with Citra, Motueka and Nelson Sauvin, I too can get way too specific about the types of farmhouse ales (AKA: saisons) I prefer. I like when they are spiked with Brettanomyces and aged in barrels, particularly those which have formerly housed white wine. I prefer Sauvignon Blanc barrels, but I’m not a picky man (despite what everything leading up to this has led you to believe). So, when speaking with local brewer Robert Masterson about future plans he had for his then yet-to-open Resident Brewing, and he told me the first thing he was going to do was get his saison into white-wine barrels so he could start aging it, I tucked that nugget away and started biding my time. It was as if he had intercepted some letter to Santa and, despite my naughty status, decided to bring my beer wish to life. A few weeks ago, that beer, Resident Saison Prestige, made its debut in 750-milliliter bottles, and I went straight to work getting my hands on some. And I’m glad I did, because it is exceptional. Oenophiles will be drawn in by a lustrous bouquet rife with aromas of lemon peel, honeysuckle, pears and grape must, while lovers of farmhouse and sour ales will go gaga for a multifarious yet balanced taste sensation offering up passion fruit, lemongrass, white pepper and oak-borne vanillins with a touch of funk delivered against a textural backdrop that’s medium and slightly creamy, leaving lingering traces of vanilla and kiwi. It’s prestigious enough to live up to its name and available exclusively at Resident’s base of operations, downtown’s The Local Eatery and Watering Hole.

From the Brewery: “Saison Prestige is a barrel-fermented, mixed-fermentation saison aged in French oak Chardonnay barrels. This farmhouse-style ale gets its character from two types of saison yeast, multiple Brettanomyces strains and Lactobacillus. The beer rested in wine barrels for over a year, before being bottled in June 2017. The beer was inspired by a few amazing American farmhouse breweries that have been putting out amazing beers for the past half-decade. We secured some amazing Chardonnay barrels from Chateau Montelena. After the saison picked up their character, we selected the three barrels that had the best-tasting beer inside. We didn’t want to utilize fruit with these killer barrels. Instead, we wanted them to stand out on their own and show San Diego what a wine-barrel and funky, tart saison can taste like without fruit additions.”—Robert Masterson, Head Brewer, Resident Brewing Company

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Sampler Flight: January San Diego Beer Events

Jan 3

Some set aside January as a time of counteractive restraint following a month or more of holiday-strength indulgence, but that doesn’t stop local breweries and bars from offering tons of temptation and darn good reasons to brush that angel off one’s shoulder and enjoy exceptional ales and lagers. Check out the quintet of extraordinary examples, then head to our events page for even more early-2018 fun.

January 13 | Second Saturday: Every month, Hamilton’s Tavern salutes a brewing company (and its patrons), by offering a wide array of that business’ brews, including numerous specialties. Few, if any, are as stocked with great and varied offerings as January’s spotlighted interest, Pizza Port. From SD-style hop monsters to dark coffee behemoths and everything in between, treats abound! | Hamilton’s Tavern, 1521 30th Street, South Park, 5 p.m.

January 15 | Five-Course Beer-Pairing Dinner: The Good Seed Food Company, a new Miralani Makers District biz from a former Urge Gastropub chef, will pair its local-and-organic-focused cuisine with culinary-minded beers at Pariah Brewing Company’s tasting room. Try an uni-infused stout with a fresh oyster, spicy pecan pie with a blonde coffee stout and much, much more (MMM). | Pariah Brewing, 3052 El Cajon Boulevard (inside CRAFT by Brewery Igniter), North Park, 6 p.m

January 20 | One-Year Anniversary: It might be the business’ first birthday, but Burgeon Beer Co.‘s approaching its celebration like time-tested veterans, with live music, an octet of beer-and-food pairings courtesy of multiple food trucks, and even more beer beyond that, including first-run cans of a Northeast-style double IPA dubbed Can’t Stop Juicin’. | Burgeon Beer Co., 6350 Yarrow Drive, Suite C, Carlsbad, 12 p.m

January 27 | Anniversary Party: Despite having one of the county’s smallest tasting rooms, Pure Project Brewing has a big day planned in celebration of two successful years in business. They’ll be converting their parking lot into a beer garden, and offering cellared and otherwise rare brews, plus two aluminum-clad anniversary collaboration beers (a triple IPA and imperial pastry stout)! | Pure Project Brewing, 9030 Kenamar Drive, #308, Miramar, 1 p.m

January 27 | Changing of the Barrels: To mark a whopping 29 years in the beer industry (the most of any San Diego brewery), Karl Strauss Brewing will hold a party at its PB headquarters fueled by a plethora of specialty beers, including this year’s barrel-aged anniversary saison and the non-oaked beer that will be siphoned into wooden receptacles and later used to toast the big three-zero. | Karl Strauss Brewing, 5985 Santa Fe Street, Pacific Beach, 5 p.m

January 30 | Supper Club: Small Bar regularly collaborates with breweries on food-and-beer events, but with an owner who is also a veteran chef, this event with Bay Ho’s Bitter Brothers Brewing figures to be a slam dunk for lovers of good eats and local ales. Go off that January diet two days early and have a fun and delicious time tossing aside that resolution in the interest of a life well lived. | Small Bar, 4628 Park Boulevard, University Heights, 6:30 p.m

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Beer Touring: Wild Barrel Brewing

Dec 13

Typically, I try to wait a while before visiting a new brewery so the brewing team has time to work out any early kinks, but recently I was so inspired by pre-open samples of beers at Wild Barrel Brewing (692 Rancheros Drive, San Marcos) that I deviated from my SOP. Also, I didn’t want to be the last beer fan in the county to make it to this early success from Stone Brewing expats Bill Sysak and Bill Sobieski (editor’s note: Hernández himself is a Stone expat). The former is known as “Dr.” Bill in beer-connoisseur circles, as he was a medic in the military, and he absolutely knows good beer, but many wondered if he’d be able to brew good beer, too. My answer: probably not…but that’s what the other Bill (the one with fermentation experience at Stone as well as Anaheim’s Hoperazzi) brings to the table.

Although he’s not milling, graining in and dry-hopping, Sysak does have a major impact on brewing decisions at Wild Barrel. In his roles as beverage supervisor and beer ambassador for Stone, he always kept his finger on the pulse of beer fans, so he is familiar with current trends and has used that knowledge to develop a sound portfolio that features numerous India pale ales (IPAs) and fruited kettle sours, a coffee milk stout, and a single style for entry-level visitors, White Rabbit Belgian-style witbier. The latter is brewed with coriander and two forms of citrus, traditional curacao orange peel, and fresh Valencia orange zest. It is light in body, lively on the palate and good enough to serve as the only non-hoppy, non-sour, decaf option.

Of late, many new breweries have had to contend with shortages of popular hops such as Citra, Mosaic, and Nelson Sauvin, but this operation is well stocked, making for a family of IPAs that feel current and almost familiar. The flagship, Indie IPA, has a medium body and savory notes of garlic and onion, while the murky Shape Shifter’s combo of Nelson, Mosaic and Idaho 7 makes for a harmonious mix of tropical fruit flavors. By far the most layered (and downright badass) of the bunch is Prince of Dankness, an 8.4% alcohol-by-volume (ABV) double IPA dry-hopped with 28 pounds of Nelson and six pounds of Motueka. The result is a beer with big pine-cone and toasted popcorn kernel overtones, plus a downright sappy finish.

As lovely and varied as the IPAs were, my favorite beer of the visit may have been Hipster Latte, a 5.5% ABV milk stout made with a blend of coffee made exclusively for Wild Barrel by Rancho Bernardo-based roaster Mostra. It is bold in its roastiness—you’re abundantly aware there is coffee in there—but it is extremely balanced and especially dry for a stout with lactose. It’s particularly impressive that Sobieski put out a beer this perfect his first time producing it and makes me look forward to trying that proprietary blend at the coffee counter that will be constructed next to the tasting room’s main entrance.

Of Wild Barrel’s early beers, I found the San Diego Vice fruited Berliner weisse series — the name illustrates how to pronounce the German word “weisse” — tasted over-fruited for my palate, with the black currant iteration coming across as a tad too sweet. Still, this is a subjective knock, and a beer having too much quality local fruit, some of which is from Sobieski’s back yard, is a first-world problem entirely. Of the three Vices, a Montmorency cherry version was my favorite. The nose is rosé all day, and it tastes of cherry and strawberry preserves.

As the business’ name implies, barrel-aged sours, stouts and strong ales will be part of Wild Barrel’s makeup, but not until its oaken stock has time to mature. Even without wood- and booze-tinged product, there is plenty of high-quality beer to draw imbibers to this North County newcomer.

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Beer Touring: Battlemage Brewing

Dec 12

It’s commonplace in San Diego to walk into a brewery tasting room and find multiple India pale ales augmented by little more than a wheat beer and stout. Hoppy beers are the money-makers, after all. In 2016, IPAs accounted for 76.4% of total sales at grocery and convenience stores (according to scan data compiled by market-research company IRI). It makes sense that brewing companies lead with IPAs and stay mostly within the box where non-hoppy stock is concerned, which makes it all the more admirable when brewers dare to buck convention and instead follow their personal tastes and passions. I recently visited such an interest, Battlemage Brewing (2870 Scott Street, #102, Vista), where the beer menu looked like something from an entirely different realm…thanks only in part to the fact the place is essentially an RPG game room replete in fantasy regalia.

Established by gaming enthusiasts (who also brewed at Ballast Point Brewing before opening their own venture), Battlemage is the perfect setting for your next D&D session, but the real otherworldliness comes from a list of libations unlike any in the county. While there are two IPAs, standard and hazy (of course), and an extra pale ale that’s Northeastern in composition (gotta pay them bills), Battlemage also offers a dark mild, old ale, hoppy amber, coffee milk stout and two versions of a white ale (neither of which is a white ale) and even a beer that lists three question marks as its style descriptor. That’s as exotic as an aasimar druid decked out in a suit of armor. And it makes for an enjoyable day of drinking for someone who appreciates all styles versus merely those which are popular, particularly because many of Battlemage’s offerings are rather well crafted.

The aforementioned Divine Light white ale is a blonde ale and lager hybrid that’s well-attenuated and easy to drink. Those qualities help a version of that beer infused with blackberries and coffee show off its added ingredients, but honestly, the base beer is more enjoyable on its own. Muradin’s Mild is complex in its overall profile, with fruity and bready notes as well as low-grade, coffee-like roastiness. The Beer is Dark and Full of Caffeine (a contender for Best Beer Name) coffee milk stout is smooth with notes of nutty java and cola. And the hoppy amber ale, Summon Ifrit, presents big evergreen notes against a super-dry, biscuity canvas.

For all of my excitement over finding rarer styles, I have to admit that the hazy Chaotic Evil extra pale ale and non-murky Hopdouken IPA were two of my favorites from Battlemage. The former was reminiscent of orangeade with muted bitterness and only slightly bumped-up viscosity, while the IPA was super-clean with a mimosa-like character. My other top-scoring beer of the day couldn’t have been more different. It was Hooded Assassin, an English-style old ale that, though young and coming in at a whopping 10% alcohol-by-volume, was extremely drinkable, coming across with notes of red fruit, vanilla and banana, plus a touch of peppery spice in the finish. Hopefully they’re sitting on a keg or two of this gentle giant for unearthing at a later date.

You don’t have to be into role-playing games to enjoy Battlemage. Admittedly, it helps, but the beer is both good and very affordable (tasters are $1.50 or you can get get a flight of five for just $5), plus there’s a separate room with a Foosball table. Bottom line, you needn’t be a level 20 paladin to appreciate this new North County brewery.

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Beer of the Week: Pariah Indie Or Bust

Dec 8

Indie Or Bust IPA from Pariah Brewing in North Park

From the Beer Writer: The importance has remained at the forefront of discussions among those within and enamored with the local craft-brewing industry. Trade organizations such as the Brewers Association and the San Diego Brewers Guild have both gone to lengths to ensure that, but at the end of the day, it’s the actions of the small, independent breweries struggling to compete against their deep-pocketed Big Beer adversaries that will carry the day. Nobody can fight the fight for them, and thankfully, many have stepped up. Count North Park’s Pariah Brewing Company among them. Earlier this year, the newcomer to the county’s brewery landscape released an India pale ale (IPA) dubbed Pariah Indie Or Bust IPA. It seems a simple tactic, incorporating the term “indie” into a beer’s name, but it is effective. It has become a popular offering for the company, which is mostly known for making outlandish ales infused with exotic ingredients. However, this is a straightforward IPA that gets its depth from a modern-day hop bill blending Citra, Galaxy and Idaho 7 varietals. The result is a beer with peach, melon and toasted pine cone on the nose, followed by grilled pineapple, guava and an orange-like juiciness leading into an extra-dry finish. It’s an ideal ale for the current marketplace; one which helps keep an item of importance top of mind while delivering a delicious, high-quality product from a truly independent brewery.

From the Brewers: “Indie Or Bust IPA came about while hanging out with the breweries that brewed the 11 Barrel IPA. (South Park Brewing owner) Scot Blair was at Resident Brewing and, while talking with him about the idea behind the beer, he asked if we’d be interested in brewing our own version. The stipulations were that it had to be 7% alcohol-by-volume and include the relative newcomer hop, Idaho 7. I’d contracted a small amount of Idaho 7 but hadn’t had an excuse to use it yet, so I jumped at the chance and brewed it literally the following day. Since the 11 Barrel IPAs had already been released, we wanted a different name and, with political slogans being used at the time fresh in our minds—as well our personal convictions—Indie Or Bust IPA seemed appropriate. The beer also features Citra and Galaxy hops. The malt bill is pretty much 100% Pilsner with a sprinkle of very lightly colored malt. Our house Wicked ale yeast undertook the fermentation. We are exceptionally proud to be a part of the indie-beer scene and we are glad drinkers today feel the same way. When it comes time for a beer, it’s either going to be an independent beer or we’re ordering a whiskey!”—Brian Mitchell, Head Brewer, Pariah Brewing Company

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