CLICK TO DOWNLOAD
this month's issue free!

Posts Tagged hops

Beer of the Week: Little Miss Hoperation Overlord

Jan 20

Hoperation Overlord Imperial Oatmeal IPA from Little Miss Brewing in Miramar

From the Beer Writer: Having written about beer for as long as I have and during such an adventurous stretch in American brewing history, it’s rare to come across something completely new. Often, such first-of-their-kind creations incorporate exotic fruits or outlandish yeast strains, but a recent oddity was based off very traditional brewing ingredients. That creation is Little Miss Hoperation Overlord, a double India pale ale with flaked oats folded into its malt bill. Brewed by Miramar newcomer Little Miss Brewing, its an IPA that features added mouthfeel in a county known for going as light as possible where malt-body is concerned with this beer-style. Admittedly, it in no way resembles a “San Diego IPA”, but in a day and age of imitation, it’s refreshing to have something not only different, but darn good. A modern-hop bill bring delicious flavors of mango, peach and candied lemon to the party, while the malt bill gives this concoction a copper appearance, brown-sugar nose and burnt caramel undertones. The viscosity provided by the oats helps convey all of that character in a smooth and even fashion. And at 8.5% alcohol-by-volume, it comes in low for a double IPA, but that’s just fine, as this is a beer you’re likely going to want to enjoy two of, anyway. And soon it’ll be available at a pair of WIP Little Miss tasting rooms in Normal Heights and Ocean Beach, the latter of which will be the fifth such space to debut on Newport Avenue between Cable Street and Sunset Cliffs Boulevard.

The future home of Little Miss Brewing’s tasting room in OB (three doors down from Culture Brewing’s satellite)

From the Brewer: “We had been planning on making a double IPA and San Diego Beer Week seemed as good of a time as any to debut it. When formulating the recipe, we decided to use oatmeal, mostly because we couldn’t think of too many imperial IPAs that use it, and also because we thought the oatmeal would take a normally big, aggressive, hoppy beer and mellow it out a little bit, creating a deceptively smooth beer. For the hops, we used Citra, Mosaic and Nugget. We wanted to showcase the fruity, citrusy, floral qualities of those hops. It wasn’t necessarily a beer that we intended to have on full-time, but the reaction to it has been overwhelmingly positive and it has quickly become one of our best-sellers, so it will stay on as long as everyone wants it.”Joe Lisica, Head Brewer, Little Miss Brewing

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Beer of the Week: Pizza Port Shark Bite Red Ale

Jan 13

Pizza Port has canned its iconic Shark Bite Red Ale in celebration of the company’s upcoming 30th anniversary

From the Beer Writer: When I first heard Pizza Port was about to hit the big three-oh(-where-did-all-the-time-go?), I could hardly believe it. Though brewing operations began at the family-owned SoCal chain’s flagship Solana Beach brewpub in 1992, it’s been slinging pies and Beer Buddies since 1987. Through it all, the concept has stayed true to the humble vision of brother-and-sister team Vince and Gina Marsaglia: provide a dependably fun and inviting place for people to enjoy themselves over pizza and house-made beers. Simple pleasure is the theme of the organization, which has grown to include a formidable quintet of “Port Holes” reaching from Ocean Beach to San Clemente, including a large-scale, production facility-equipped brewpub in Carlsbad’s Bressi Ranch community. Along the way, a boatload of awards have been lavished on the multifaceted interest’s beers, and numerous members of its brewing team have gone on to starring roles at breweries across Southern California. Its an impressive evolution that, from a beer-perspective, all started with a hoppy offering that was far ahead of its time and helped define San Diego’s lupulin-driven brewing style: Pizza Port Shark Bite Red Ale. When it came time to can a beer in celebration of Pizza Port’s 30th anniversary, this mainstay of its extensive and impressive canon was a no-brainer. Piney in its hop profundity (especially for the time-frame in which it debuted) and nicely bolstered by a toffee-like yet dry malt-body, this beer is a piece of San Diego brewing history that has endured based on the tenets of good taste and craftsmanship. Each of the company’s brewpubs will hold release parties for Shark Bite on Tuesday, January 17, where six-packs of the beer will be available for purchase. Additionally, Pizza Port will hold festivities (details to be announced) to celebrate 30 years in business at its Solana Beach location the last weekend of March, shortly after its official anniversary on March 23.

From the Brewer: “Shark Bite Red was the first beer we made. I wanted to do a red instead of an amber, probably because I had a red ale at Callahan’s Pub and I liked it more than amber ales. It has more crystal-malt flavor. Before making that first batch, I was so excited about the our seven-barrel system, that I decided to go inside the brew-kettle and have a couple of beers. I ended up just sitting there and falling asleep, then waking up and not knowing where I was. We actually had to throw away the first batch of Shark Bite we brewed. Somebody hooked up the thermocouple backwards and we didn’t know, so it cooled the yeast down and the beer didn’t ferment. It tasted like motor oil. Other than that, there aren’t many weird or funny stories. I just made beer and people drank it. There were no guidelines, but even if there were, we didn’t read them. We were just making beer…beer we liked.”Vince Marsaglia, Co-owner/Brewmaster, Pizza Port

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Q&A: Mikkel Borg Bjergsø

Jan 10

Owner & Brewmaster, Mikkeller Brewing San Diego

Last year, 10-year Denmark-based gypsy brewer Mikkel Borg Bjergsø hammered down stakes in Miramar, transforming AleSmith Brewing Co.’s original brewery into Mikkeller Brewing San Diego. His brewing team spent most of 2016 getting the feel of the facility. Now that group feels ready to be more aggressive in its fermentation activities. Bjergsø has vowed his brick-and-mortar will debut one new small-batch beer on a weekly basis beginning January 12 at its tasting room with a trio of new offerings: bourbon barrel-aged Beer Geek Brunch imperial oatmeal coffee stout, Fruit Face raspberry-coffee Berliner weisse and Uklar IPA. Future “San Diego Beer Release Series” debuts will take place every Saturday starting January 21. Keeping up with such a rapid rate of innovation and execution is no easy task. Curious about this and what it’s been like for this world-famous brewer to find his feet in San Diego, we sat down with him to pick his brain.

WC: What are some surprises you’ve encountered in San Diego?
Mikkel Borg Bjergsø: It’s been surprising how different the beer scene is in the U.S. compared to Europe. There are so many great players—especially in San Diego—and so many great beers. You really have to make an effort to stand out. I think with the new special-release series we will.

WC: What drove the decision to release a new beer every week?
MBB: Brewing a lot of different beers and beer-styles is in our DNA, and it was only a matter of time before we set out to launch a similar release schedule in San Diego. At this point we have an amazing crew in place, the brewing equipment is all dialed in, and our management setup is so in tune with our vision that we are confident now is the time. Most people will associate us with a hectic output of beers in all styles, shapes and formats, which is exactly what they should expect. That, and the totally unexpected, of course. Having your own brewery opens up a world of possibilities that are not usually doable when working in someone else’s brewery, whether it’s contract brewing or on a collaboration basis.

WC: What is your day-to-day involvement like regarding brewing at Mikkeller SD?

MBB: We’ve had to adjust to both the physical distance and time difference, but I am fortunate in the sense that I have to rely on the very capable hands of our head brewer Bill Batten and his team of skilled assistant brewers. It’s still my recipes and vision, which we will discuss through our daily email chains and our weekly conference-call.

WC: What other interesting or exciting developments are on the horizon for Mikkeller SD?
MBB: There are a lot of super-exciting things under development, but the sour and barrel-aged beer programs are two projects we are putting a lot of effort into. We have such a creative team over there, and it seems that no matter how crazy the idea and/or recipe I throw at them, they enthusiastically turn those into great beer. We are also working on new collaborations with other breweries, and non-brewers as well.

WC: You’ve spent more time than ever in San Diego. What are some of your favorite local breweries?
MBB:
I hate to name favorite breweries as it pushes the rest to the side. In the San Diego area there are obviously a ton of amazing brewers, from the old guys like Stone Brewing, Green Flash Brewing Co. and Ballast Point Brewing, to the young guns like Abnormal Beer Co., Toolbox Brewing Co., Modern Times Beer Co. and many others. I still have a big heart for our friends at AleSmith, so if I have to name one…

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Beer of the Week: Mikkeller Amoeba Brett IPA

Dec 16

Amoeba Brett IPA from Mikkeller Brewing San Diego

From the Beer Writer: When Mikkeller announced plans to merge with San Diego stalwart AleSmith Brewing Company, I, like many, was very excited. This partnership brought together two very different yet reputable brewing interests—a gypsy with a flair for the wild and dramatic, and a 20-year-old brewery with a portfolio of traditional hits. When Mikkeller Brewing San Diego debuted in April, it was with great anticipation that I tasted through its first-run beers. That list was well over a dozen strong, but the greatest feature of the beer line-up was its length. I had hoped for more adventurous beers in keeping with the decade-old Mikkeller MO, but most of the offerings were either traditional beers—pale ale, porter, Berliner weiss, old ale—or one-off versions of staples like Mikkeller’s Beer Geek Breakfast. Frankly, it was pretty underwhelming. But there was one beer that stood out from the crowd right off the bat; one that I would go on to rave about during many a conversation about local beer…Mikkeller Amoeba Brett IPA. The Brettanomyces that gives it its funky, dry, peppery qualities is profound, but not overly so. The wild yeast teams with the beer’s hop-bill to form a nice symbiosis hinted at by the pine-forest-meets-barnyard scents rising from this India pale ale’s fluffy white head. Up until now, I haven’t had the opportunity to have as much of this beer as I’d have liked, but that all changed two weeks ago when the brewery canned what is now the only Brett-infused beer I’ve seen in aluminum cylinders. It’s best to keep this beer refrigerated to retard the effects of the wild yeast and keep the hoppiness at maximum levels, but with flavors this good, it’s unlikely long-term storage will be much of an issue.

From the Brewer: “Amoeba Brett IPA is available exclusively at our tasting room. It’s designed to showcase the flavor and aroma complexity that can be created by using certain hop varietals along with different Brettanomyces strains. Amoeba is a 100% Brettanomyces-fermented IPA with an alcohol content of 6.5% . Our inaugural canned batch showcases a blend of Galaxy, Centennial, Columbus and Equinox hops. With this combination, we focused on notes of passion fruit, papaya, citrus and pine, which creates an incredible stage to layer with the tropical-fruit notes that the specialty Brettanomyces strain that we have selected can create. This special blend creates an aromatic and flavorful treat that any IPA aficionado will be sure to appreciate. The intention of Amoeba is to create a beer without boundaries that will be ever evolving, so be sure to try our future releases and follow this unique style that will be ever-changing and always offer something unique.”—Bill Batten, Head Brewer, Mikkeller Brewing San Diego

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Beer of the Week: Bay City Dubbel

Nov 25
Bay City Brewing Company's Dubbel

Bay City Brewing Company’s Dubbel

From the Beer Writer: Last week’s featured beer was a double IPA. For most local craft-fans, that’s the only double-referencing beer-style they’re bound to seek out, but I’ve been a long-time fan of Belgian dubbels. The middle-ground member of the monastic family of Belgian beers, they traditionally come in a chestnut-to-brown-hued package registering between six-and-eight percent alcohol-by-volume (ABV), and are the complete opposite of the hop-forward, dry, sun-geared ales San Diego is famous for. As such, few local breweries produce dubbels, so when I sample any I come across. Such was the case last week at Lomaland’s Bay City Brewing Company, when I found myself in the midst of a raucous pre-Gulls game packed-house. Once the hockey fans cleared out, I ordered the 7% ABV Bay City Dubbel and, before even taking a taste, felt myself falling in love thanks to big, flowery, banana-like aromas. Those sensory clues were in keeping with the flavor-profile of the beer, which is big on Belgian yeast character coming across as banana bread, baking spices and calendulas. Unlike poor examples of this style, the beer was not overly sweet and was above-average from a drinkability standpoint.

From the Brewer: “Bay City Dubbel is a dark, amber-colored ale inspired by the monks of the Franciscan Order. Dark crystal malts from both Europe and the U.S. give this beer its darker appearance and a subtle caramel flavor. The Belgian yeast used during fermentation lends a spicy character that balances the malty sweetness and creates a medium-bodied beer. Belgian yeasts are unique to brew with because of the phenols, esters and glycerin that they produce at various levels. This particular strain creates a medium bodied beer that is easier to drink than some more traditional versions of the style.”—Chris West, Head Brewer, Bay City Brewing Company

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Next Page »