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Posts Tagged green flash brewing

Green Flash Brewing to open Nebraska facility

Aug 16

Over the past half-decade, a number of large craft brewing interests have opened additional manufacturing facilities far removed from their home bases in an effort to reduce shipping costs while increasing beer freshness and, of course, overall production capabilities. Logically, most of these moves involved West Coast operations such as Sierra Nevada Brewing, Stone Brewing and Ballast Point Brewing selecting sites on the East Coast. The latter two now operate full-scale breweries in Virginia, as does Mira Mesa-based Green Flash Brewing, which went live with its 58,000-square-foot facility in Virginia Beach last year. With that milestone surpassed, owners Mike and Lisa Hinkley are en route to the next marker on the expansion highway, and it’s hammered on the side of Interstate 80 in the capital city of Nebraska.

Today, Green Flash announced its recent purchase of a 10,000-square-foot brewing facility at 1630 P Street in Lincoln, Nebraska. The brewery, which was previously owned and operated by Ploughshare Brewing Company, was acquired intact, and includes both tasting room and restaurant components. Laying down stakes in the Cornhusker State will allow for faster delivery and better regional pricing to key Midwest metropolises, including Denver, Kansas City and Minneapolis, as well as surrounding states such as Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Wyoming and the Dakotas. This is part of an ongoing effort by the company to establish regional footholds in key cities across the country. According to Hinkley, there is no target number in mind, but the Lincoln facility will not be the last for Green Flash.

When asked what made Lincoln attractive, Hinkley says, “I have long-time friends in neighboring Omaha at Nebraska Brewing Company. I went to visit them and look at the facility that became available and it was an easy decision. It’s a great college town with great spirit.”

Currently, there are no breweries in Nebraska brewing more than the 10,000 barrels per year that Green Flash aims to produce, so they will come in as both the newest and biggest kid on the block. Lincoln’s brewing interests register in the teens, of which Zipline Brewing is the largest. Green Flash should be able to compete for customers early thanks in part to its inherited restaurant, which is 2,000 square feet in size with seating for 100, including a 30-seat mezzanine area.

Between 20 and 30 taps will dispense beers from Green Flash and sister-brand Alpine Beer Company, while the menu will include burgers, sandwiches, an array of appetizers and sauces made using ingredients from local purveyors. Understanding the importance of football in a college town (and being within walking distance of the University of Nebraska), a state-of-the-art A/V system will facilitate spectating of Cornhusker games. This is the first of Green Flash’s facilities to include a restaurant.

Green Flash expects to employ more than 20 people in Lincoln. The 15-barrel brewery will be operated under the direction of brewmaster Erik Jensen, who will remain based in San Diego. Both Green Flash and Alpine beers will be produced in Nebraska. If all goes as scheduled, that facility will be up, running and welcoming guests in as few as 90 days.

Green Flash, which is currently the 41st largest craft brewing company in the U.S. and will celebrate its 15th year in business this fall, is following in the footsteps of other large brewing interests who operate or are in the process of constructing breweries in the Midwest. A local member of that contingent is the aforementioned Ballast Point, which is building a 12,000-square-foot brewpub in Chicago’s West Loop/Fulton Market area that is scheduled to open next year.

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Ballast Point holding Family Reunion brews

Aug 10

Nickel Beer owner and former Home Brew Mart employee Tom Nickel (third from right) during a Family Reunion collaboration brew day at Ballast Point’s Miramar brewery.

Before Ballast Point Brewing was a company capable of commanding decuple figures, before it grew into San Diego County’s largest brewery and one of the biggest beer-producers in the country, before there even was a brewery called Ballast Point, there was Home Brew Mart (HBM). That Linda Vista hobby shop—one of the first to grace America’s Finest City—opened quietly in 1992 and, over the following quarter-century, has ignited a fire for recreational fermentation within a great many ale-and-lager neophytes. That includes individuals who now own breweries and brew professionally. Some of that contingent even worked for HBM in its early days. In celebration of the big two-five, Ballast Point is creating Family Reunion collaboration beers with those ex-employees as well as former BP brewers, an impressive assemblage of well-known, award-winning talent.

Ballast Point vice president Colby Chandler dumps hops over Amplified Ale Works head brewer Cy Henley’s head as part of a collaboration brew tradition.

Several of the beers have already been released, while others are scheduled to be brewed in time for them to all be on-tap at HBM’s 25th anniversary event on September 24. The following is a breakdown of the collaborators, their creations and their past.

  • Saludos Saison: The third brewing of a strong saison with lemon peel, orange-blossom honey and thyme inspired by Brasserie Dupont’s Avec Les Bon Vouex brewed with Tom Nickel. He was HBM’s sixth employee and now owns and operates Nickel Beer Company as well as O’Brien’s Pub and West Coast Barbecue & Brews.
  • Loud & Proud: An English-style barley wine with cherrywood-smoked malt brewed with Cy Henley, the head brewer at Amplified Ale Works. He was a clerk at HBM before moving on to Alpine Beer Company and Green Flash Brewing.
  • Name TBD: Ex-HBM clerk Larry Monasakanian is now with Fall Brewing and will help brew a 5% alcohol-by-volume saison based off the recipe for BP’s charity offering, Brother Levonian. This version will be brewed with grains of paradise, local sage and equally local wet hops from Star B Ranch, then fermented with a blend of Brettanomyces and saison yeast,
  • Scripps Tease: An extra special bitter (ESB) made with toasted oats and Ethiopia Ayeahu RFA coffee beans from James Coffee Company (close to BP’s Little Italy brewpub) brewed with Nate Stephens and Clayton LeBlanc, the brew crew for Eppig Brewing. Both worked for BP, the former led Little Italy operations while the latter brewed at its Scripps Ranch facility.
  • Swemiceros: A hoppy Kolsch dry-hopped with fruity, citrusy, herbal hops brewed with Nick Ceniceros, head brewer at 32 North Brewing. Nick worked at Scripps Ranch before moving to Fall Brewing and eventually his current digs.
  • Bay to Bay: A black California common that’s “obnoxiously dry-hopped” with Mosaic brewed with Alex Tweet, who won a BP homebrew contest with his recipe for Indra Kunindra, a curry export stout the company still manufactures. Tweet went on to brew for Modern Times Beer before moving to Berkeley to open the popular Fieldwork Brewing.
  • Name TBD: John Maino and Greg Webb, former Scripps Ranch brewers and co-owners of Temecula’s Ironfire Brewing, will help brew a wet-hop India pale ale (IPA) fermented with Brett.

Eppig Brewing’s Clayton LeBlanc talks about his time working at Ballast Point with the company’s current employees.

In an effort to increase its current employee base’s knowledge on the history of BP and its eldest venue, vice president Colby Chandler asked each collaborator to speak to present-day brewers about their time with the company, how it was then and how it prepared them to venture out on their own. Many said that making beer at such a fast-growing brewing company provided them wide-ranging experience as well as reference points for overcoming myriad obstacles. According to Chandler, many brewery owners, in particular, felt their time with BP made it much easier once they were working for themselves.

In addition to the HBM anniversary event, BP is also holding a series of beer-pairing dinners incorporating the aforementioned collaboration brews at HBM. The next will take place on August 24 and include five courses served with Swemiceros, Bay to Bay, Scripps Tease and various other BP beers. Chandler, Tweet, Stephens, LeBlanc and Ceniceros will all be in attendance.

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August Events Sampler Flight

Aug 1

There are no official holidays in the month of August. Given that, one might expect it to be a pretty humdrum month from an events standpoint, but local breweries are taking charge of their—and your—destiny, offering a plentitude of good times for all to enjoy. Check out some of these higher-profile affairs, then refer to our events page for even more craft-beer happenings.

August 5 | The Full Pint 10th Anniversary: Sure, you get your local beer news from the pages (both paper and web) of West Coaster, but online beer-news site The Full Pint has been doing this even longer than us, and will celebrate a decade of slinging suds stories with an epic tap-list of rarities from esteemed breweries that includes more than 20 beers brewed just for this party. | Toronado San Diego, 4026 30th Street, North Park, 9 p.m. (general admission session)

August 6 | Hop-Picking Picnic: Join the Womens Craft Beer Collective and the folks from Pure Project Brewing at a Fallbrook farm to help pick hops that the latter entity will use to brew a beer. It’s a free-form event where you can come and go as you please (a brewery visit will follow for those who last to the end). All you have to do is bring a picnic item (and perhaps some beer) to share. | San Diego Golden Hop Farm, 467 Solana Real, Fallbrook, 9 a.m.

August 12 | Anniversary IPA Fest: To celebrate their first year of business, the staff at North Park Beer Company are taking advantage of their ability to pour guest beers, and stocking their taps with more than 30 IPAs of varying strengths, styles and hop bills, including their own impressive stock of hoppy delights. It doesn’t get much more San Diego than that. | North Park Beer Company, 3038 University Avenue, North Park, 11 a.m.

August 18 & 19 | Stone 21st Anniversary Celebration: Stone Brewing continues to show beer fans how to take a festival to the next level, inviting breweries from all over the country to help take over a college campus over a two-day span that includes a Friday night VIP session replete with brewer meet-and-greet possibilities. Join them at this charity event as they celebrate finally being of legal age to drink. | California State University, 333 South Twin Oaks Valley Road, San Marcos, Times Vary

August 27 | Treasure Chest Beer & Food Fest: Green Flash Brewing Company is holding the seventh edition of its charity festival benefiting Susan G. Komen, and everyone will get lucky at this luau featuring 20-plus rare and exotic beers (including brews from Alpine Beer Company) plus food from beer-centric eateries including Urge Gastropub, Carnitas’ Snack Shack and Nomad Donuts. | Green Flash Cellar 3, 12260 Crosthwaite Circle, Poway, 12 p.m.

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Alta Brewing opening soon in Barrio Logan

Jul 25

If you miss the good old days, when classic C hops ruled the day, pale ales registered mid-range on the SRM meter and beer menus went from blonde to stout, Brett Stampf can relate. A veteran brewer who worked at Stone Brewing and Green Flash Brewing, he can appreciate the IBU-rich beers that played a big part in those operations’ successes. He says he left each as said success led to each growing into larger entities, stating that just wasn’t for him. He prefers a smaller stage and the freedom that provides, and has spent the past two years constructing his own passion project with partners John Bull and Josh Gilko. That spot, Alta Brewing Company (1983 Julian Avenue, Barrio Logan) is on track to open in early August (ABC willing).

Alta Brewing co-founder and brewmaster Brett Stampf

When San Diegans last tasted Stampf’s beers, he was the opening brewmaster at La Jolla Brewing. While there is little he cared to bring with him from that venture, his current beer list includes a number of offerings from his time there. When the doors open, he will have a quintet of ales available. The first is a golden ale with a surprisingly biting finish that will be served on CO2 and nitrogen. Ditto the house IPA, which is hopped with big-money hops, Citra and Simcoe, and comes in at 7% alcohol-by-volume. A 6% ABV pale ale is a throwback that comes across like a tamer version of Sierra Nevada’s copper-colored flagship, with a bitter finish that resembles that of Stampf’s Chinook- and Centennial-stoked brown ale. A dry Irish-style stout rounds things out. Belgian-style ales and an IPA hopped exclusively with Azacca are in the works.

Those beers will be available solely in Alta’s tasting room, which was pounded into shape by the company’s founders—all of which have contracting backgrounds—in a 2,000-square-foot space at the base of the Bread and Salt building. That 40,000-square-foot facility is being reborn and reconfigured with an eye toward art and artisan manufacturing. Alta’s corner of it includes an indoor bar nicely appointed with a large bull-head mural by local artist Gloria Muriel featuring beer’s four main ingredients, plus a lacquered wood-topped bar with rebar forged into a playful design based on the letters A, L and T. Rail bars line two walls, giving way to views of Barrio Logan and an outdoor patio that will someday border a beer garden.

Alta’s brewery comprises a five-barrel brewhouse feeding into 10-barrel fermentation tanks. Stampf says he will aim to produce around 500 barrels in year one, but has the ability to max out annual production at 1,100 barrels. Stampf says the name Alta translates to over and above, and describes the way he is looking to brew; remaining true to tradition, but keeping up quality while infusing a bit of himself and his personal preferences. The skeletal bull-head logo is a nod to his business partner of the same name and is affectionately named “Juan Toro”. A “recovering contractor”, Bull has worked on numerous local restaurant projects, including Tribute Pizza, Union Kitchen and Tap, One Door North, PB Shore Club and Pacific Beach AleHouse. Once Alta is up and running, the team will identify sites for one or two satellite tasting rooms. So far they have evaluated two, Chula Vista and Ocean Beach.

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Coronado Brewing to purchase Monkey Paw Brewing

Jul 18

The craft-brewing industry is in a state of flux, forcing companies within it to reexamine their business models and, in the case of larger operations, alter them in order to thrive or, in some cases survive. Larger operations such as Stone Brewing, Green Flash Brewing and Karl Strauss Brewing have all had to adjust course as consumer preferences shift to smaller, local, independent breweries, and active consumer demographics begin to skew toward younger factions, many of which have only ever drunk craft beer. It’s to be expected of interests that are among the country’s 50 largest brewing companies. Though it is considerably smaller and, at its heart still a family-run business, Coronado Brewing Company has been quite vigilant over the past several years, keeping an eye on the rapidly changing market and making moves to weather an uncertain storm. The latest of those moves includes today’s announcement that CBC will purchase East Village-based brand Monkey Paw Brewing. Owner Scot Blair‘s other businesses, South Park Brewing and Hamiltons Tavern, are not part of the deal.

Blair has had lofty aspirations for his beer-making business since opening it in 2011, but was not satisfied with progress toward increased production and distribution. He examined a number of options for meeting those goals, including acquisition, but says he wouldn’t have sold to just anybody. A stalwart figure within the craft-beer world for more than a decade, Blair knows the industry and the individuals within it, and says it was his long-standing respect for and friendship with CBC owners Ron and Rick Chapman that distinguished this as the right move for him and his business. Another key factor is control. Blair has a vision for Monkey Paw and its beers, and will remain intimately involved with the brand, focusing solely on beer—conceptualization and growth of the entire portfolio.

This deal is reminiscent of Green Flash’s 2014 acquisition of Alpine Beer Company. That move allowed for increased production of Alpine beers at Green Flash’s much-larger brewing facilities. Likewise, Monkey Paw, which produced less than 700 barrels last year, will now have the majority of its beers produced at CBC’s Bay Park headquarters, while still making beer on the 15-barrel system at its East Village pub. CBC began brewing its beers at that site—affectionately referred to as “Knoxville” for the street it occupies—in 2013, a year after taking over the 14,000-square-foot property. Since then, it has taken over several other buildings bordering the brewery, creating a rather impressive cul-de-sac campus. CBC is also in the process of installing a kitchen at Knoxville to increase the draw of its tasting room. This is particularly important with the impending arrival of a satellite tasting room from Benchmark Brewing Company and a new brewery, Deft Brewing Company, slated for arrival in Bay Park this year.

CBC is also changing up its game in the southerly municipality of Imperial Beach. The company opened a bar and restaurant there in 2014, and recently signed on to construct a 7,500-square-foot brewpub at the upcoming Bikeway Village on Florence Street. This will increase brewing capacity in a more high-profile location not far from CBC’s original brewpub on its namesake island. Meanwhile, CBC has ceased distribution to certain states, strategically tightening things up to better compete in the marketplace and maximize profits and expenditures.

And two months ago, the company announced the Chapmans’ investment in SouthNorte Brewing Company, a new venture headed by CBC head brewer Ryan Brooks. That operation, basically a CBC offshoot or sub-brand, will meld the brewing cultures of Baja California and Southern California, but there’s more to that fermentation fusion than mere ingenuity. An MO like that figures to appeal to demographics CBC does not currently reach in as great a quantity as they would like. Ditto Monkey Paw’s liquid wares, which skew to a younger demographic more interested in locavorianism, that likely wishes to support an edgier brand versus a company that recently celebrated its 21st anniversary. While this acquisition (which is set to be completed by September) may seem odd to those not paying attention, a look at CBC’s recent body of work where business-model adjustment is concerned shows the logic behind it and how it fits into a large and intricate puzzle.

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