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Posts Tagged Ballast Point Brewing Company

Reckless Brewing’s new tasting room

May 25

Miramar’s Carrol Way is home to a pair of businesses that couldn’t be more different from each other. On one side of the street is the colossal manufacturing headquarters of Ballast Point Brewing, a business with such astronomical growth and distribution of award-winning, to-style beers that it garnered $1 billion from Constellation Brands when that company took it over in 2015. Equipped with a large restaurant outfitted with an expansive, outdoor deck, it is the largest brewery and brewing entity in San Diego County.

Directly across the street is Reckless Brewing Company (9040 Carroll Way, Miramar),  a quirky little brewery producing beer on a much more modest scale. But it’s not just size and quantity that form a Grand Canyon-sized divide between these otherwise similar businesses. The beer is worlds different, as well. And that’s just how owner Dave Hyndman likes it. An outlier who revels in marching to his own beat, he crafts beers that defy numerous style guidelines and has cultivated a clientele that sees the beauty in that non-conformity. Ditto the unique design of his tasting room, which draws together innumerable random and disparate items to further illustrate the nature of Hyndman and his brewery. But that sampling space closed last week…because Hyndman recently finished construction on a new tasting room in the suite next door.

Reckless Brewing’s new tasting room is still one of a kind. In time it will surely be equipped with the bric-a-brac and visual accessories that made its predecessor such a standout. But for now a colorful Twister grid painted onto the floor goes a long way to communicating Hyndman’s spirit to visitors. And while there are still amateur-constructed pieces of furniture making up most of the bar, the cold-box is outfitted in a nice-looking brick façade. Back at ground zero, Reckless Brewing’s original suite will now be devoted solely to brewing.

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A Quick How-To on Supporting Local Breweries

May 16

Recently, I was interviewed about the state of the local brewing industry in the wake of Big Beer interests—AB InBev-owned 10 Barrel, MillerCoors-owned Saint Archer, and Constellation Brands-owned Ballast Point Brewing—elbowing their way into the San Diego market. In answering questions, I echoed the primary lament of employees at independent breweries throughout our county, which is the concern that people who want to support local, authentically “craft” breweries will think they are doing so by purchasing beers from the aforementioned companies (as well as other acquired brands including Wicked Weed Brewing, Elysian Brewing and Goose Island as well as “faux craft” brands such as Blue Moon and Shock-Top) due to subterfuge and falsehoods conveyed via Big Beer marketing campaigns. It is a consumer’s right to choose. If they make an informed decision to purchase ales and lagers from Big Beer because they aren’t concerned about buying and drinking local, that is their prerogative. But for people who do care and go out of their way to buy local, San Diego breweries simply want those folks to get what they they think they are paying for and feel comforted in the knowledge that they are, in fact, supporting San Diego breweries.

At this point, I was asked what consumers can do to ensure they aren’t fooled. It’s a great question and, being so entrenched in the industry, something brewing company employees probably don’t think about as often as would be prudent. The obvious answer is “educate yourself”, but it leads to another great question: HOW? And I have a solid answer: Visit the Breweries list at SDBeer.com and scan the list of Guild members. The Guild’s regulations dictate that no brewing company owned in whole or in part by a Big Beer interest can qualify for membership. This is to protect the integrity of membership as the organization strives to educate the public on the importance of supporting local breweries (be on the lookout for an upcoming “get educated” campaign from the SDBG), especially as they find themselves under increasing attack from macro-beer giants with far greater resources and far less honorable (and far less legal) business practices. You can trust this list to guide you to bona fide independent operations. And you can help local breweries by sharing this online resource with others who share your locavorian ethics. It actually protects local consumers from more than just Big Beer.

Membership in the San Diego Brewers Guild and participation in its initiatives is voluntary. Although the Guild enjoys nearly 100% membership by qualifying businesses, no arms are twisted. The Guild has been key to the evolution and prominence of San Diego craft beer for the past two decades. Yet, believe it or not, there are some local brewery owners who choose not to be a part of it. While that decision in and of itself does not vilify a local, independent brewery, it does tell you something about that company. In a time when banding together and helping not only local businesses, but local consumers has never been more important, there are outliers who aren’t heeding the call to arms. Locavores looking to support local breweries  would do well to patronize the 100-plus operations looking to actively protect this region’s reputation and incredible sense of community over those who abstain.

As an aside (and I am in no way asserting that owners of non-SDBG member breweries fit the following description), there’s a new strain of brewery entrepreneur out there—people who think they have all the answers; who don’t help their neighbors and colleagues; who go it alone because they think so highly of and want everything for themselves; who honestly believe that every component of their business should be proprietary in an industry built on the open and honest exchanges of information, equipment, ingredients, manpower and, of course, beer. It’s sad to see. Without the openness and friendship they opt out of, the American craft-beer movement would not have progressed to the point where they would be able to be a part of it. To enter the brewing industry and actively erode the sense of camaraderie that makes it so special rivals the obfuscation and monkey-wrenching of Big Beer. With so many San Diego breweries upholding the long-held values that make this region’s beer scene so special, there’s no reason not to patronize them first or even exclusively. The key component there is to know who is making your beer and who is behind each brewery. Because so many of these individuals are locally focused beer-lovers just like you, it’s a fun rabbit hole to venture into, and the best first step is SDBeer.com.

San Diego beer is a wonderful thing. Locals and guests alike should feel good about enjoying it. The latest efforts of macro-breweries and money-grabbing newcomers have complicated things and made it harder to have a beer in tandem with a clean conscious. Fortunately, consulting the list of active San Diego Brewers Guild members provides an easy way to put all the business BS aside and go back to savoring local, independent, artisanal beer.

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O’Sullivan Bros. Brewing for sale

May 4

In 2014, Ed O’Sullivan became the first graduate of UCSD Extension’s Brewing Certificate program to open his own brewery. That interest, O’Sullivan Bros. Brewing Company, is located in a business park suite at 9879 Hibert Street in San Diego’s Scripps Ranch neighborhood. The brewery specializes in dark beers, specifically porters, stouts and barrel-aged versions of both styles. A number of O’Sullivan Bros.’ beers have won awards regionally and Ed now teaches a course called “The Brewery Startup” as part of the program he graduated from. Ed owns several other business’ and due to increasing demands from those, he is actively seeking a purchaser for his brewery business.

Ed says he has built a solid fan-base that frequents his tasting room and is not interested in closing. His hope is that an entrepreneur will pick up where he left off and acquire the brewery turnkey style. One of the most impressive features of the facility is a sizable quality-control laboratory that has been in operation from the start. Labs tend to be an afterthought or something slated for construction once revenues reach the point where they are more economically feasible. O’Sullivan is the only independent brewery in Scripps Ranch, though the nation’s 13th largest brewing interest, Ballast Point Brewing, operates a production brewery and tasting room in the community as well.

The official advertisement reads as follows:

Turnkey Nano Brewery for Sale in San Diego. Includes brewery, lab and tasting room. 3bbl all electric, plc controlled 3 vessel brew house, with 7 3bbl fermenters and 1 3bbl brite. Production output is about 400 bbls/yr. Facility is approx. 1700 sq/ft. All supporting equipment, i.e. water treatment, chemical cleaning, Glycol Chiller, Cold Room, bottling equipment, kegs, keg washer, spare parts, tasting room furniture and fixtures are all in place and operating. All equipment is less than 3 years old and was purchased new. Cooperage, bottles and raw material inventory included along with an established local clientele. Perfect opportunity for the husband and wife team or couple of friends looking to break into the industry, or a larger brewery looking for an offsite R&D facility for new project, or a restaurant chain looking to supply its own beer. This is the cleanest, most technically sophisticated nano-brewery on the west coast. See www.osullivan-brothers.com for general info. Contact Ed O’Sullivan at ed@osullivan-brothers.com. Serious inquiries only.

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San Diego International Beer Festival winners

May 2

Winners of the San Diego International Beer Festival’s professional brewing competition were released today. A component of the San Diego County Fair’s annual festivities, the competition included entries from across the globe judged by professional beer judges and Southern California brewing professionals in late-April. A total of 68 medals were awarded to San Diego-based breweries. Of that number, 23 were gold, 21 were silver and 24 were bronze.

San Diego breweries won all three medals in eight categories: American-style Red/Amber Ale, Bitter, Bold Stout, Brett and Other Sour Beer, German-style Ale, German-style Weiss, Imperial Stout and Pilsener. Miramar-based AleSmith Brewing Company once again took home Champion Brewery honors behind three medals—a gold and silver in the same category (one of which was awarded to a Scotch ale) and a gold in the Barley Wine category.

The most local medals went to Pizza Port. That brewpub’s Carlsbad brewpub also won a gold and two silvers. Its Ocean Beach arm won two (one gold, one bronze) and Bressi Ranch production brewery earned a silver. The most medals awarded to a single brewery went to San Marcos’ Rip Current Brewing Company and less-than-a-year-old North Park interest Eppig Brewing. Both of those companies earned a gold, silver and two bronzes. San Marcos’ The Lost Abbey and South Park Brewing Company earned three medals apiece, as well. Also impressive was Rip Current winning two of three medals in the German-style Bock category.

The following is a complete list of the winners from this years SDIBF…

Gold Medals

  • AleSmith Brewing Old Numbskull, Barley Wine
  • AleSmith Brewing Private Stock Ale, British-style Strong Ale
  • Bagby Beer Sweet Ride, Pilsener
  • Bagby Beer Three Beagles Brown, English-style Brown Ale
  • Barrel Harbor Brewing Rungnir, Belgian-style Dark Ale
  • Belching Beaver Brewery (Oceanside) Here Comes Mango! IPA, Fruit Beer
  • Burgeon Beer Taking the Biscuit, Bitter
  • Council Brewing Magic Factory Lickable Staves, Brett and Other Sour Beer
  • Dos Desperados Brewery Blonde Kolsch, German-style Ale
  • Duck Foot Brewing Black Leprechaun, Specialty Stout
  • Duck Foot Brewing London Calling, Porter
  • Eppig Brewing Kottbusser, American Wheat Ale
  • Finest Made Ales Imperial Red Ale, Imperial Red Ale
  • Karl Strauss Brewing Mosaic Session IPA, Session Beer
  • Mason Ale Works Charley Hustle, American-style Amber/Red Ale
  • Mike Hess Brewing Umbix, Imperial Stout
  • Mother Earth Brew Co. Renown Brown, American-style Brown Ale
  • North Park Beer Covington Cream Ale, Golden or Blonde Beer
  • Pizza Port (Carlsbad) Z Man, Bold Stout
  • Pizza Port (Ocean Beach) Junk In Da Trunkel Dunkel, German-style Weiss
  • Prohibition Brewing Hop Chronicles, American-style Strong Pale Ale
  • Resident Brewing Golden Kiss, French- and Belgian-style Ale
  • Rip Current Brewing Java Storm Coffee Imperial Stout, Coffee Porter and Stout

Silver Medals

  • AleSmith Brewing Wee Heavy, British-style Strong Ale
  • 2kids Brewing Incredulous Ordinary Bitter, Bitter
  • Breakwater Brewing Rye Dawn, Rye Beer
  • Burning Beard Get Thee to a Nunnery, Belgian-style Pale Ale
  • Coronado Brewing Coastwise, Session Beer
  • Eppig Brewing Glitz and Glam, Fruit Beer
  • Intergalactic Brewing Shut Up Wesley Wheat, American Wheat Ale
  • Karl Strauss Brewing Windansea Wheat, German-style Weiss
  • The Lost Abbey Serpent’s Stout, Imperial Stout
  • The Lost Abbey Veritas 018, Brett and Other Sour Beer
  • Mason Ale Works Gunnar Noir, American-style India Black Ale
  • Mikkeller San Diego Forste Fodselsdag, Specialty Beer
  • Pizza Port (Bressi Ranch) Sharkbite Red Ale, American-style Amber/Red Ale
  • Pizza Port (Carlsbad) Kickflip Kolsch, German-style Ale
  • Pizza Port (Carlsbad) Today Was a Good Day, Australian/International-style Pale Ale
  • Pure Project Brewing Sensei, Pilsener
  • Rip Current Brewing Breakline Bock, German-style Bock
  • San Diego Brewing Biere Welter Wit, Belgian-style Wit or White Ale
  • Second Chance Beer Mulligan Irish Red, Irish-style Red Ale
  • South Park Brewing Grassmarket, Scottish-style Ale
  • Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens – Liberty Station Cimmerian Portal, Bold Stout

Bronze Medals

  • Abnormal Beer Tummy Cuddles, Chocolate and Chili Beer
  • Amplified Ale Works Barrel-Aged Nyctophobia, Wood and Barrel Aged Strong Stout
  • Ballast Point Brewing Piper Down, Irish-style Red Ale
  • Belching Beaver Brewery Tavern & Grill Thizz Is What It Is, Imperial India Pale Ale
  • Burning Beard Brewing Circle of Hops, American-style Pale Ale
  • Coronado Brewing Seacoast Pilsner, American-style Lager
  • Council Brewing Magic Factory Broken Wand with Raspberries, Brett and Other Sour Beer
  • Culver Beer Tiger Ride, Belgian-style Pale Ale
  • Eppig Brewery Natural Bridge Baltic Porter, Porter
  • Eppig Brewing Sinister Path, Bold Stout
  • Fall Brewing Plenty for All, Pilsener
  • Indian Joe Brewing Pineapple Passionfruit Gose, German-style Weiss
  • The Lost Abbey Carnevale Ale, French- and Belgian-style Ale
  • Mike Hess Brewing Deceptio, American-style India Black Ale
  • New English Brewing Barleywine, Barley Wine
  • Nickel Beer Devil’s Copper, Rye Beer
  • Novo Brazil Brewing Mulata, American-style Amber/Red Ale
  • Pizza Port (Ocean Beach) Eyelashes, Belgian-style Pale Strong Ale
  • Rip Current Brewing Delaminator Doppelbock, German-style Bock
  • Rip Current Brewing Rescue Buoy Russian Imperial Stout, Imperial Stout
  • Societe Brewing The Harlot, Hybrid Belgian-style Ale
  • South Park Brewing 2 Griffs, Bitter
  • South Park Brewing Here N Gone, German-style Ale
  • Stone Brewing Delicious IPA, American-style India Pale Ale

The three-day public beer-fest portion of the SDIBF will take place at the Del Mar Fairgrounds, Friday, June 16 through Sunday, June 18. Tickets and information can be found online.

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Battlemage Brewing set to open in Vista

Apr 27

You can scarcely throw a 100-sided die in Vista without hitting a brewery, and come the weekend of May 6, two guys used to utilizing that role-playing game tool will debut the latest entrant into that sudsy community—Battlemage Brewing Company (2870 Scott Street, Suite 102, Vista). Best friends and fermentationists Ryan Sather and Chris Barry named their interest after a hybrid class from a game they’ve been playing for the past 20 years: D&D (Dungeons and Dragons, non-RPGers). Sather has spent the three years working at Home Brew Mart. Barry’s Ballast Point Brewing experience is a bit shorter—he’s been there the past year after moving on from managing Mother Earth Brew Co.’s homebrew shop. In opening Battlemage, they are going from advising people on brewing to doing it themselves on a professional scale.

As far as the beers they brew on their five-barrel system, they’re not limiting themselves. Both have medaled in a plethora of categories as homebrewers—IPAs and wide-ranging American, Belgian, English and German styles. The duo expects to offer traditional styles as well as classic styles given twists that make then “truly magical.” A white ale that comes across as a light-hopped blonde ale with the drinkability of a lager will share beer-board space with a aromatically hoppy American amber and a variety of IPAs because, as Sather says, it wouldn’t be San Diego without them. When Battlemage’s doors open, 8 to 10 beers will be on tap. Initial kettle sours will give way to future barrel-aged sour ales, as well. They hope to have a bottle release or two at some point and can once they have the funds to do so, but for now, draft is the name of their game.

The tasting room is designed so customers feel as if they are entering a medieval castle. Weapons and mystical creatures will grace the walls in the smallish space. Sather says he and Barry intend to embrace their nerdy side by putting on a variety of different gaming nights, ranging from fantasy to classic D&D. An event where the comic-book artist who developed Battlemage’s logo teaches patrons how to draw dragons and other graphic delights is under development. Also in the works is a collaboration with the distillery two doors down, Henebery Spirits, where Battlemage will age beers in used barrels, while the distillers will age whiskey in those same barrels once the beer is drained from them.

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