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Posts Tagged abnormal beer

Q&A: Derek Gallanosa

Aug 24

Head Brewer, Abnormal Beer Company

There are movers and shakers in the local beer-brewing and beer-drinking subculture. Then there is Derek Gallanosa, a BMOC among both factions who, while coming up in the industry with Karl Strauss Brewing before leaving to open and head brewing operations at Rancho Bernardo’s Abnormal Beer Company, maintained his recreational fanatic status via beer trading, tourism and bottle shares. On top of that, he has spent the past three years as an instructor in San Diego State University’s Business of Craft Beer certificate program. Few are the craft-inclined in San Diego who don’t know of him, making his announcement earlier this week that he’ll be moving away to pursue a new brewery project all the more surprising. We sat down to ask him about it and found out the opportunity he’s pursuing is as exciting as it is bittersweet.

What is most exciting about taking on a new endeavor?
Starting fresh with a new lineup of beers and new customers. It’s going to be a learning process just like any new chapter of your life but I feel I have the experiences to succeed in most situations.

What are you able to share about your next chapter?
The name of the brewery will be released in the near future but it will be somewhere in Northern California. I will be a partner in the business, and we will have a big focus on direct-to-customer sales with a lot of can and bottle releases. Just like Abnormal, I will continue to innovate, learn and grow as a brewer. There is no “brewmaster” here, just someone who wants to spend a lifetime knowing more than he did the day before.

Will you continue to collaborate as you did at Abnormal?
The collaborations will continue and will be a part of our marketing strategy. There is so much knowledge to share and so much to gain through collaborating with other breweries. I am excited to continue the friendships I have gained during my time at Abnormal and hope to expand my network with even more like-minded craftsmen.

What is your transition plan?
I am confident Abnormal will continue on without any change in quality. We have a talented team in place and I will spend the next month unloading everything I have learned in the past two-and-a-half years running the brewery. We are a dynamic company and will always try to push the limits our creativity, so my job is to set them up for success as they continue to be a big player in the craft-beer scene.

Do you think the brewing style will remain the same at Abnormal?
Abnormal has always been about keeping a few core beers [perpetually] on tap while having a bunch of specialty one-offs fill up the rest of the in house tap list. I see that still being the case moving forward, same core beers and a few other specialties that cater to the demand of our customers.

Who will be taking over brewing at Abnormal?
The new head brewer for Abnormal will be Nyle Molina as of October 1. The knowledge and experience he has gained from previously working at Green Flash Brewing and Funky Buddha Brewery was the reason we brought him into the Abnormal family. In the few weeks he has been here, he has shown great work ethic and a passion to produce quality products. With that being said, we are now looking for a new brewer to fill his role so send those résumés to info@abnormalbeer.com.

What is the hardest part about leaving Abnormal?
All the people that I work with that have been so supportive of the beer coming out of the brewery, the fact that I have an awesome restaurant I can order lunch from every day, the beer dinners, the camaraderie of the San Diego brewing scene, the drinking community that I love to geek out with, and all that beer I’m leaving in oak barrels for the next guy will be things I will miss. But the most important thing I will miss by moving away are the friends and family that I love who have supported me along my personal and professional journeys.

Any parting words for the San Diego beer community?
Thank you to all the fans of our beer from San Diego and beyond. A lot of people ask me what it’s like to live a dream. I’ve been responding with, “I don’t know,” because right now I feel like I have been living beyond a dream. It’s too much to comprehend. The people who choose to spend their hard-earned money on our beer or take the time, money and effort to listen to me lecture in my Marketing Craft Beer class at SDSU are the ones whose hands I would love to shake in the next month. So once again, from the bottom of my heart, THANK YOU!

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Best San Diego Beer Futures: North

May 24

The project site for Wild Barrel Brewing in San Marcos

This is the third in a series of four posts taking a look at some of the most promising brewing venues currently in the works around San Diego County. The first two examined spots in the eastern and western communities. Today, we switch our attention to North County and the Hops Highway.

Wild Barrel Brewing Co., San Marcos: Two ex-Stone Brewing employees are teaming up to produce a wide variety of beers steps from Stone’s original brewery (now home to Port Brewing and The Lost Abbey). Renowned beer-expect Bill Sysak is leading the charge while Bill Sobieski (formerly of Anaheim’s Hoparazzi) will do the brewing using a brewhouse procured from El Cajon’s since-closed URBN St. Brewing Co.
Click here to read more about this project

Horus Aged Ales, Oceanside: Creating a portfolio made up exclusively of barrel-aged beers is no easy feat, but it’s one Kyle Harrop is eager to attempt. And he’ll do it with a little help from his friends, namely brewers from all over the country, including local interests such as Abnormal Beer Co., Rip Current Brewing and fellow North County work-in-progress White Fence Brewing. This is a boutique brewery if there’s ever been one.
Click here to read more about this project

Ebullition Brew Works, Vista: While information on the beers that this long-time work-in-progress will debut are hard to come by, details uncovered about the environment they’ll be consumed within are promising. A stylish tasting room with plenty of bar space and a special beer-delivery system in which glasses are placed onto pop-up taps and filled from the bottom up will provide a pretty cool differentiator that doesn’t exist in any brewery in the county.

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San Diego International Beer Festival winners

May 2

Winners of the San Diego International Beer Festival’s professional brewing competition were released today. A component of the San Diego County Fair’s annual festivities, the competition included entries from across the globe judged by professional beer judges and Southern California brewing professionals in late-April. A total of 68 medals were awarded to San Diego-based breweries. Of that number, 23 were gold, 21 were silver and 24 were bronze.

San Diego breweries won all three medals in eight categories: American-style Red/Amber Ale, Bitter, Bold Stout, Brett and Other Sour Beer, German-style Ale, German-style Weiss, Imperial Stout and Pilsener. Miramar-based AleSmith Brewing Company once again took home Champion Brewery honors behind three medals—a gold and silver in the same category (one of which was awarded to a Scotch ale) and a gold in the Barley Wine category.

The most local medals went to Pizza Port. That brewpub’s Carlsbad brewpub also won a gold and two silvers. Its Ocean Beach arm won two (one gold, one bronze) and Bressi Ranch production brewery earned a silver. The most medals awarded to a single brewery went to San Marcos’ Rip Current Brewing Company and less-than-a-year-old North Park interest Eppig Brewing. Both of those companies earned a gold, silver and two bronzes. San Marcos’ The Lost Abbey and South Park Brewing Company earned three medals apiece, as well. Also impressive was Rip Current winning two of three medals in the German-style Bock category.

The following is a complete list of the winners from this years SDIBF…

Gold Medals

  • AleSmith Brewing Old Numbskull, Barley Wine
  • AleSmith Brewing Private Stock Ale, British-style Strong Ale
  • Bagby Beer Sweet Ride, Pilsener
  • Bagby Beer Three Beagles Brown, English-style Brown Ale
  • Barrel Harbor Brewing Rungnir, Belgian-style Dark Ale
  • Belching Beaver Brewery (Oceanside) Here Comes Mango! IPA, Fruit Beer
  • Burgeon Beer Taking the Biscuit, Bitter
  • Council Brewing Magic Factory Lickable Staves, Brett and Other Sour Beer
  • Dos Desperados Brewery Blonde Kolsch, German-style Ale
  • Duck Foot Brewing Black Leprechaun, Specialty Stout
  • Duck Foot Brewing London Calling, Porter
  • Eppig Brewing Kottbusser, American Wheat Ale
  • Finest Made Ales Imperial Red Ale, Imperial Red Ale
  • Karl Strauss Brewing Mosaic Session IPA, Session Beer
  • Mason Ale Works Charley Hustle, American-style Amber/Red Ale
  • Mike Hess Brewing Umbix, Imperial Stout
  • Mother Earth Brew Co. Renown Brown, American-style Brown Ale
  • North Park Beer Covington Cream Ale, Golden or Blonde Beer
  • Pizza Port (Carlsbad) Z Man, Bold Stout
  • Pizza Port (Ocean Beach) Junk In Da Trunkel Dunkel, German-style Weiss
  • Prohibition Brewing Hop Chronicles, American-style Strong Pale Ale
  • Resident Brewing Golden Kiss, French- and Belgian-style Ale
  • Rip Current Brewing Java Storm Coffee Imperial Stout, Coffee Porter and Stout

Silver Medals

  • AleSmith Brewing Wee Heavy, British-style Strong Ale
  • 2kids Brewing Incredulous Ordinary Bitter, Bitter
  • Breakwater Brewing Rye Dawn, Rye Beer
  • Burning Beard Get Thee to a Nunnery, Belgian-style Pale Ale
  • Coronado Brewing Coastwise, Session Beer
  • Eppig Brewing Glitz and Glam, Fruit Beer
  • Intergalactic Brewing Shut Up Wesley Wheat, American Wheat Ale
  • Karl Strauss Brewing Windansea Wheat, German-style Weiss
  • The Lost Abbey Serpent’s Stout, Imperial Stout
  • The Lost Abbey Veritas 018, Brett and Other Sour Beer
  • Mason Ale Works Gunnar Noir, American-style India Black Ale
  • Mikkeller San Diego Forste Fodselsdag, Specialty Beer
  • Pizza Port (Bressi Ranch) Sharkbite Red Ale, American-style Amber/Red Ale
  • Pizza Port (Carlsbad) Kickflip Kolsch, German-style Ale
  • Pizza Port (Carlsbad) Today Was a Good Day, Australian/International-style Pale Ale
  • Pure Project Brewing Sensei, Pilsener
  • Rip Current Brewing Breakline Bock, German-style Bock
  • San Diego Brewing Biere Welter Wit, Belgian-style Wit or White Ale
  • Second Chance Beer Mulligan Irish Red, Irish-style Red Ale
  • South Park Brewing Grassmarket, Scottish-style Ale
  • Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens – Liberty Station Cimmerian Portal, Bold Stout

Bronze Medals

  • Abnormal Beer Tummy Cuddles, Chocolate and Chili Beer
  • Amplified Ale Works Barrel-Aged Nyctophobia, Wood and Barrel Aged Strong Stout
  • Ballast Point Brewing Piper Down, Irish-style Red Ale
  • Belching Beaver Brewery Tavern & Grill Thizz Is What It Is, Imperial India Pale Ale
  • Burning Beard Brewing Circle of Hops, American-style Pale Ale
  • Coronado Brewing Seacoast Pilsner, American-style Lager
  • Council Brewing Magic Factory Broken Wand with Raspberries, Brett and Other Sour Beer
  • Culver Beer Tiger Ride, Belgian-style Pale Ale
  • Eppig Brewery Natural Bridge Baltic Porter, Porter
  • Eppig Brewing Sinister Path, Bold Stout
  • Fall Brewing Plenty for All, Pilsener
  • Indian Joe Brewing Pineapple Passionfruit Gose, German-style Weiss
  • The Lost Abbey Carnevale Ale, French- and Belgian-style Ale
  • Mike Hess Brewing Deceptio, American-style India Black Ale
  • New English Brewing Barleywine, Barley Wine
  • Nickel Beer Devil’s Copper, Rye Beer
  • Novo Brazil Brewing Mulata, American-style Amber/Red Ale
  • Pizza Port (Ocean Beach) Eyelashes, Belgian-style Pale Strong Ale
  • Rip Current Brewing Delaminator Doppelbock, German-style Bock
  • Rip Current Brewing Rescue Buoy Russian Imperial Stout, Imperial Stout
  • Societe Brewing The Harlot, Hybrid Belgian-style Ale
  • South Park Brewing 2 Griffs, Bitter
  • South Park Brewing Here N Gone, German-style Ale
  • Stone Brewing Delicious IPA, American-style India Pale Ale

The three-day public beer-fest portion of the SDIBF will take place at the Del Mar Fairgrounds, Friday, June 16 through Sunday, June 18. Tickets and information can be found online.

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New chef, menu, cans at The Cork & Craft

Mar 16

Duo of Colorado lamb at The Cork & Craft in Rancho Bernardo

In less than two years, The Cork and Craft has established itself as one of inland North County’s best restaurants. The food and ambience are enough that it would be a draw even without its onsite winery and brewery. Those amenities—particularly Abnormal Beer Company—are tremendous value-addeds, particularly when their wares are incorporated into special pairing dinners featuring guest chefs, vintners and breweries.

C&C opened with adventurous chef Phillip Esteban at the helm. He made such a name for himself, both in RB and at the many offsite events he participated in—that he was hired away by powerhouse bar-and-restaurant entity Consortium Holdings to serve as its culinary research-and-development mastermind. His departure left big clogs to fill at C&C, but current executive chef Scott Cannon has been on the job for three months and is turning out solid cuisine that might even be better suited for the tastes of RB denizens.

Dishes remain intelligent, but are a bit easier for the average diner to get their head around. They’re less fussy but just as flavorful. And in some cases, even more flavorful. A prime example is a seemingly simple salad of raw and grilled endive. It’s the only first-course greenery I’ve felt deserving of must-try status, but it’s perfection on a plate. Spiced pecans bring in a gingerbread-like flavor segueing beautifully with the sweetness of cider-like vanilla-poached pears complement and Moody Blue goat cheese contrasts. On the opposite end of the spectrum is a breakfast-for-dinner starter, seared foie gras over French toast with a fried quail egg and nasturtium. The toast is golden and not the least bit soggy while the edible flowers serve a purpose by lending a touch of balancing bitterness.

A Colorado lamb entrée features nicely cooked chops, but the star of the plate are tender agnolotti stuffed with tender braised shoulder-meat. It’s an edible education in what al dente pasta should feel like. Other dishes like a Hamachi crudo appetizer served with a shishito pepper relish as well as scallops with meaty king trumpet mushrooms (and, oddly, more shishito peppers) lack the wow-factor of the previously mentioned recipes in Cannon’s current canon, but they’re in keeping with fare offered at C&C from day one.

Back on the beer-front, Abnormal is set to release its first two canned beers at a release-party this Saturday, March 18 starting at 11 a.m. at C&C. Both of those aluminum-clad brews are hazy (AKA: New England-style or Vermont-style) India pale ales. The first is New Money IPA, a juicy, 7% alcohol-by-volume (ABV) offering massively dry-hopped with Amarillo and Simcoe, followed by its industrial-strength cousin, Turbidity, an 8.5% ABV double IPA brewed with Mosaic and Idaho 7, that pours thicker than the average hop-bomb. Both beers will be sold in four-packs and dishes from the restaurant’s bar-menu will be available.

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Q&A: Mikkel Borg Bjergsø

Jan 10

Owner & Brewmaster, Mikkeller Brewing San Diego

Last year, 10-year Denmark-based gypsy brewer Mikkel Borg Bjergsø hammered down stakes in Miramar, transforming AleSmith Brewing Co.’s original brewery into Mikkeller Brewing San Diego. His brewing team spent most of 2016 getting the feel of the facility. Now that group feels ready to be more aggressive in its fermentation activities. Bjergsø has vowed his brick-and-mortar will debut one new small-batch beer on a weekly basis beginning January 12 at its tasting room with a trio of new offerings: bourbon barrel-aged Beer Geek Brunch imperial oatmeal coffee stout, Fruit Face raspberry-coffee Berliner weisse and Uklar IPA. Future “San Diego Beer Release Series” debuts will take place every Saturday starting January 21. Keeping up with such a rapid rate of innovation and execution is no easy task. Curious about this and what it’s been like for this world-famous brewer to find his feet in San Diego, we sat down with him to pick his brain.

WC: What are some surprises you’ve encountered in San Diego?
Mikkel Borg Bjergsø: It’s been surprising how different the beer scene is in the U.S. compared to Europe. There are so many great players—especially in San Diego—and so many great beers. You really have to make an effort to stand out. I think with the new special-release series we will.

WC: What drove the decision to release a new beer every week?
MBB: Brewing a lot of different beers and beer-styles is in our DNA, and it was only a matter of time before we set out to launch a similar release schedule in San Diego. At this point we have an amazing crew in place, the brewing equipment is all dialed in, and our management setup is so in tune with our vision that we are confident now is the time. Most people will associate us with a hectic output of beers in all styles, shapes and formats, which is exactly what they should expect. That, and the totally unexpected, of course. Having your own brewery opens up a world of possibilities that are not usually doable when working in someone else’s brewery, whether it’s contract brewing or on a collaboration basis.

WC: What is your day-to-day involvement like regarding brewing at Mikkeller SD?

MBB: We’ve had to adjust to both the physical distance and time difference, but I am fortunate in the sense that I have to rely on the very capable hands of our head brewer Bill Batten and his team of skilled assistant brewers. It’s still my recipes and vision, which we will discuss through our daily email chains and our weekly conference-call.

WC: What other interesting or exciting developments are on the horizon for Mikkeller SD?
MBB: There are a lot of super-exciting things under development, but the sour and barrel-aged beer programs are two projects we are putting a lot of effort into. We have such a creative team over there, and it seems that no matter how crazy the idea and/or recipe I throw at them, they enthusiastically turn those into great beer. We are also working on new collaborations with other breweries, and non-brewers as well.

WC: You’ve spent more time than ever in San Diego. What are some of your favorite local breweries?
MBB:
I hate to name favorite breweries as it pushes the rest to the side. In the San Diego area there are obviously a ton of amazing brewers, from the old guys like Stone Brewing, Green Flash Brewing Co. and Ballast Point Brewing, to the young guns like Abnormal Beer Co., Toolbox Brewing Co., Modern Times Beer Co. and many others. I still have a big heart for our friends at AleSmith, so if I have to name one…

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