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San Diego Beer News

March Events Sampler Flight

Mar 1

When it comes to beer and revelry, there’s far more to March than St. Patrick’s Day. A varied assortment of imbibing opportunities awaits over this 31-day span, so much that this sampling of standout events only scrapes the surface. For the full line-up of goings-on, check out our events page.

March 2 | Reopening: It took nearly two years for the family behind Indian Joe Brewing to get back into action after closing their original Vista brewery, but they’re back with a much larger facility, a new head brewer, beers both new and old, and a two-story tasting-room they’re just dying to show off! | Indian Joe Brewing, 2123 Industrial Court, Vista, 3 p.m.

March 4 | Renaissance: Each year, Churchill’s Pub & Grille culls its extensive library of rare, specialty beers, and calls in favors from the brewing community to assemble a primo ale-and-lager list to offer in tandem with outrageously decadent food specials in celebration of this sudsy North County staple’s anniversary. | Churchill’s Pub & Grille, 887 West San Marcos Boulevard, San Marcos, 11 a.m.

March 5 | Stone IPA Madness—Festival of Hops: The county’s largest and, perhaps, hoppiest brewery, Stone Brewing, is holding a hop-driven extravaganza where attendees can sample an assortment of India pale ales, including prototypes and small-batch creations never before tasted by the public. | Stone Brewing World Bistro & Gardens, 1999 Citracado Parkway, Escondido, 11 a.m.

March 11 | Best Coast Beer Fest: Will Ferrell’s annual suds festival is returning and making good on its mission to raise funds for Cancer for College—a non-profit helping cancer survivors overcome barriers to higher-education—via enjoyment of beer, food and live music in the San Diego sunshine. | Embarcadero Marina Park South, 200 Marina Park Way, Downtown, 2 p.m.

March 18 | SD Homebrew Fest: San Diego’s pro-brewers point to the county’s strong homebrewing culture when asked about the region’s beery success, and this festival celebrates that spirit care of more than 35 unique homebrew creations, all of which will vie for best-of-show honors decided by event attendees. | The North Park Observatory Parking Lot, 2891 University Avenue, North Park, 12 p.m.

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Oceanside’s Horus Aged Ales to feature 100% barrel-aged portfolio

Feb 28

Kyle Harrop of Horus Aged Ales

You may not have heard of Kyle Harrop, but plenty of brewers in San Diego and beyond are familiar with him. A fervent bottle-sharer and festival-goer for more than a decade, he’s made lots of industry-friends—many of whom he met before they entered the brewing game—and is preparing to make his own jump into the pro-ranks with his work-in-progress operation, Horus Aged Ales (4040 Calle Platino, Suite 120, Oceanside). Everything from brewing to barrels to blending, packaging and even the logo will be 100% him. That’s not an unfamiliar scenario in nano-rich San Diego County, but what is unique is that all of Horus’ beers will be barrel-aged.

Harrop says he has solid recipes for IPAs, but his sours and fruited beers have garnered the greatest compliments by the aforementioned industry insiders. From a consumption perspective, he finds the wares of inspirational entities Brasserie Cantillon, Funk Factory, Hill Farmstead and Side Project both delicious and fascinating. Thus, wild, Bretty and buggy brews, mixed-fermentation and spontaneously fermented brews will make up Horus’ portfolio. Those beers will be available at a tasting room in Oceanside’s Rancho Del Oro neighborhood outfitted in a “bird of prey meets Southwestern” motif featuring rustic custom tables, hawk paintings and photographs, and Mexican blankets hand-cut by Harrop’s wife. The entire facility comes in at 3,200 square feet, and provides room for next-phase additions that include puncheons and fouders.

Harrop with Derek Gallanosa during a brew day at RB’s Abnormal Beer Co.

Though his is a one-man operation, collaborations are a big part of the company-culture. Harrop recently completed brew-sessions at New Orleans’ Courtyard Brewery, Pomona’s Homage Brewing, and Rancho Bernardo’s Abnormal Beer Company. The latter yielded a Belgian-style quadrupel conceived by Harrop and head brewer Derek Gallanosa, both of whom are self-proclaimed beer-geeks who are doing well in their professional transitions, thanks in great part to relationships forged in their days as recreational connoisseurs. Harrop recalls many tasting sessions, including a standout evening in a Carlsbad Motel 6 where he, Julian Shrago and Bill Sysak tasted their way through some rare offerings. Shrago has gone on to become one of the most award-winning brewers in the country at Los Angeles’ Beachwood BBQ & Brewing, while Sysak is known the world over for his beer-knowledge and is in the process of building his own interest, Wild Barrel Brewing Company, in a site down the street from San Marcos’ The Lost Abbey. Harrop has stayed in touch with many such ambitious ale appreciators, and has future collaborations lined up with El Segundo Brewing (located in his original home-town), Monterey’s Alvarado Street Brewery, Phoenix’s Wren House Brewing, Miami’s J. Wakefield Brewing, Richmond’s The Answer Brewpub, and Great Notion Brewing in Portland, Oregon. And here at home, he’ll brew an old ale with Rip Current Brewing in San Marcos and multiple beers with a future Vista concern called White Fence Brewing.

When asked where and when beer-fans will be able to taste these collaborations, Harrop says to keep an eye out for upcoming information about an event “like nothing else the craft-beer world has seen before” at which each of the beers crafted by him and his network of allies will be available. As far as Horus’ barrel-aged stock, those will be released in 750-milliliter bottles, numbering anywhere from 150 to 650 total per-batch. Those will go on-sale online and occasionally be distributed to popular bottle-shops. Horus’ first bottled beer, a sour ale, is scheduled to debut at Bine & Vine in Normal Heights.

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Ten Years for TapRoom

Feb 25

Kyle and Kevin Conover

Brothers Kyle and Kevin Conover have run Pacific Beach’s TapRoom for ten years. Today and tomorrow they’re hosting a big celebration complete with Pliny the Younger tappings, a massive specialty beer list with more than 100 offerings, Swell and Mostra coffee pouring stations, plus sales of a one-off canned AleSmith Speedway Stout variation called “Boxcar.”

Can you tell us about some beers you’ve been proud to pour?
We’ve had some previous anniversary beers go on to be successful, which is cool. Belching Beaver’s Mexican chocolate peanut butter stout, made for our eighth anniversary, became Viva La Beaver; Modern Times’ TapRoom 7 Deadly Sins evolved into Monsters’ Park; and brewer Kevin Buckley, while he was at Latitude 33, brewed Coconuts on Rye for our sixth anniversary. That beer is now The Patsy at his new spot Barley Forge in Costa Mesa. Also, for a time we had a house pale ale brewed by Coronado, and before that, Alpine.

The one-off AleSmith/TapRoom Boxcar Speedway Stout

Why open in PB?
10 years ago we wanted to give people the opportunity to drink craft beer who might not normally be drinking it. Back then it was us and Liar’s Club in Mission Beach selling craft beer. We get a lot of tourists and it’s great to show them a part of San Diego’s culture and community. We are proud that we were one of the first affiliate members of the San Diego Brewers Guild.

How did Boxcar come about?
We approached AleSmith about a year ago as one of their long-standing local accounts. Their Anvil ESB was one of the first beers to get us into craft beer, and for 10 years now we’ve had an average of five AleSmith beers on tap at all times. It was fun collaborating with Peter and their brewers on the recipe.

What we ended up with was an imperial stout aged in bourbon barrels for about a year with Madagascar vanilla beans, Brazil Forastero cocoa nibs, hatch and mulato chilis, and a blend of Columbian and Burundi coffee locally roasted by Swell Coffee. We’re excited to have enough to put on tap for about two years straight, and we’ll be selling individual cans in small cardboard “boxcars.”

As a side note, we actually got into beer through homebrewing and using AleSmith beers as examples of beers we’d like to make. We used to brew with Peter Perrecone, who’s now at Belching Beaver.

10+ years ago the brothers at work on the TapRoom

What’s next?
We’re actually working on a second location, this one in University Heights at the intersection of Florida St. and El Cajon Blvd. That project is a couple years down the line, but we’re really looking forward to it.

 

 

Beer of the Week: Bear Roots Bear Cookie

Feb 24

Bear Cookie Chocolate Peanut Butter Stout seved on nitro at Vista’s Bear Roots Brewing

From the Beer Writer: Peanut-butter beers enjoyed a brief boom two or three years ago, but even at the height of their popularity, they were polarizing. Adventurous drinkers and fans of the flavor of peanut-butter embraced them with open arms while “beer purists” denounced them as nutty bastardizations of their beloved beverage of choice. While there are few I’ve enjoyed, I’ve never had anything against these brews. Made with various (in the best cases, all-natural) peanut additives, they are usually dark beers that are brewed with deeply-kilned malts, and sometimes cacao or chocolate, to bring on a dessert-like flavor-profile. I approach these beers the same way I approach the last course of a meal, in search of a luscious, sweet sensation. But because it’s beer versus a hibernation-inducing slab of cake, drinkability is important. It can’t be overly sugary and has to balance that peanut-butter essence. Most breweries’ attempts at this come up short, but this is not so at Vista’s Bear Roots Brewing. This one-year-old nano’s Bear Cookie chocolate peanut butter stout is like a well-made truffle filled with nut-infused nougat. These flavors are presented in just the right proportions in a 6.4% alcohol-by-volume beer that has a gently satisfying presence on the palate that’s soft and velvety when dispensed on nitrogen. It is hands-down the best peanut-butter beer being made in San Diego County right now.

From the Brewer: “When I first started home-brewing and dreaming of the idea of opening a brewery, I made a lot of beer around the styles my wife and I enjoyed drinking. Bear Cookie was one that was brewed for my wife and inspired by other great versions on this style. When we first opened our doors, we had not planned on coming to market with this style, as North County had a few already, but given this was my wife’s favorite of my home-brews, it was hard not to eventually put it on tap. Originally, we poked fun at ourselves by calling it ‘We Made One Too”. One thing we love about the craft industry is that you can run a serious business but have a lot of fun doing it along the way! After all, we make beer for a living. Eventually, we realized that coming up with actual names for our beer would be important as we grew, so we turned to our most trusted source for some naming advicec…our then three-year-old. Anytime I would work late nights at the brewery, he would ask if I was going to the Bear Cookie store. Given our name, Bear Roots, our sons’s love for cookies, and the fact that our beer has cookie elements in it, my wife and I thought “Bear Cookie” was very fitting. We use eight different malts, including chocolate, roasted barley, Munich, oats and a few more. The base of the beer is bready, but has a lighter body and crisp finish. On nitro, I think the flavors really blend nicely and it’s one of my go to beers when enjoying a pint at the brewery. Given the fact we are attached to a homebrew store, we have been able to experiment and refine this recipe over the last year, making it one of our most popular beers. I love that we have a completely different take on the style, yet it is enjoyed by many craft-beer fans who dabble in chocolate peanut butter goodness!”Terry Little, Owner & Brewmaster, Bear Roots Brewing Company

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Addressing Green Flash and Alpine rumors

Feb 23

Since the moment Green Flash Brewing Company acquired Alpine Beer Company back in 2014, there has been concern among protective fans of the latter about that brand’s future. Over the past two-plus years, numerous rumors have popped up, but never in such abundance and covering so many topics as in the weeks following Green Flash’s recent round of layoffs. The company dismissed approximately 25 employees over the span of a few days. Since then, numerous sources have signaled the beginning of the end in talks with industry colleagues. Enough so, that we recently went to Green Flash owner Mike Hinkley and other company representatives for direct responses to each of them.

Rumor: It’s been reported that Hinkley has stepped down from the CEO position.
Response (from Green Flash): Hinkley is still the CEO and his title has not changed. Chris Ross was recently promoted from chief operating officer to president, and is reporting to Hinkley. This promotion recognizes the great knowledge and vast experience that Ross brings to the Green Flash organization. Over the past year-and-a-half, Ross has built a solid operations department. In his expanded role as president, every department at Green Flash will benefit from his insight and business acumen.

Rumor: Hinkley has moved to Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
Response (from Green Flash): Hinkley is dividing his time between both coasts to be close to the Virginia Beach brewery, the San Diego brewery and Florida. He plans to spend less time in the brewery and more time on the road with his beloved sales team, the Road Warriors.

Rumor: Alpine’s founding family—Pat, Val and Shawn McIlhenney—will soon have no affiliation with the company.
Response (from Hinkley): The Hinkleys and the McIlhenney’s continue to own Alpine Beer and Green Flash. McIlhenneys forever is the retention plan. If Shawn has children someday, we will send them all to brew-school and hope for the best. Pat is an awesome brewer. Shawn is an awesome brewer. Hoping it’s in the genes. None of us will live forever, but Alpine Beer will.

Rumor: Brewing operations will cease permanently at Alpine Beer’s brewery in Alpine.
Response (from Hinkley): We plan to brew Alpine Beer in Alpine forever. We are currently working with the landlord on site-development and hope to build a new brewery in Alpine as soon as possible.

Rumor: Green Flash is working on constructing a facility in Texas.
Response (from Hinkley): Green Flash will eventually build a brewery in the middle of the country. The motivation? We are in the business of making and selling beer. It makes great business-sense to bring fresh beer to market and connect with customers close to the point-of-sale. We love Texas, but there are no specific plans to build there, or anywhere else, yet. We are just getting comfortable in our Virginia digs.

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